Jurickson Profar has been ruled out for the season

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This was supposed to be Jurickson Profar’s breakout season and his presence played a part in the Rangers’ willingness to trade second baseman Ian Kinsler, but instead the 21-year-old former top prospect is going to end up missing the entire season.

Profar held his own as a 20-year-old rookie last season, but shoulder problems sidelined him during spring training and he never got healthy, eventually undergoing surgery. Calvin Watkins of ESPN Dallas reports that he’s been ruled out for the remainder of the season and isn’t even scheduled to begin a throwing program until mid-August at the earliest.

If all goes well the Rangers plan for Profar to recoup some of the at-bats he missed by playing instructional league ball in October, followed by winter ball. And hopefully he’ll be at full strength in spring training.

Just one of many reasons why 2014 has been a mess for the Rangers.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.