Comment of the Day: in the 60s they lamented showboating players too

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This is a tweet, not a comment, but it’s in reference to the Gibson/Drysdale stuff from earlier. From Mike Dumas:

It’s funny… just a few days ago I was listening to the radio broadcast of the 1968 World Series, which Bullet Bob appeared in. During one of the games, announcers Jack Buck and Pee Wee Reese are discussing a controversy about Lou Brock “showboating” on the base paths, and Reese mentions how back in the old days when he was playing, a pitcher would’ve “low-bridged” a hitter to tried that stuff, but went on to say how nowadays (i.e., the ’60s) that doesn’t seem to happen so much anymore.

So the guy who probably knew the Dodgers better than any other team and who, at the time he said it, was broadcasting a Cardinals game during Bob Gibson’s signature season, didn’t think that the existence of Bob Gibson and Don Drysdale had put a stop to flash and disrespect and all of that? And that pitchers back in his day wouldn’t stand for this stuff?

I am shocked. Shocked, I tell you.

Angels’ Pujols passes Mays for 5th on homer list with No. 661

Pool Photo-USA TODAY Sports
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ANAHEIM, Calif. — Los Angeles Angels slugger Albert Pujols passed Willie Mays for fifth place on the career home run list, hitting No. 661 on Friday night against Texas.

The 40-year-old Pujols connected for a solo homer with two outs in the fifth inning. He sent Wes Benjamin‘s fastball on a 1-2 count over the wall in left field.

Pujols has hit five homers this season. He tied Mays last Sunday at Colorado.

It is only Pujols’ second home run since Aug. 4. He now trails only Barry Bonds (762), Hank Aaron (755), Babe Ruth (714) and Alex Rodriguez (696).

Pujols has one more season left on his contract with the Angels after this year.

Benjamin was the 428th different pitcher Pujols homered against in his career. Only Bonds has homered against more pitchers (449).