Phillies wanted Joc Pederson, Corey Seager, and Julio Urias from Dodgers for Cole Hamels

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FOX Sports’ Jon Morosi reported Monday that the Phillies have made ace left-hander Cole Hamels available ahead of Thursday’s July 31 trade deadline, but the asking price on him is apparently sky-high.

Bob Nightengale of USA Today writes that the Dodgers — who are known to be in the market for a top-tier starting pitcher — reached out to the Phillies front office recently but were told it would take top prospects Joc Pederson, Corey Seager, and Julio Urias to get Hamels. Los Angeles quickly said no.

Pederson, a 22-year-old center fielder, has batted .318/.450/.585 with 22 home runs and 25 stolen bases in 91 games this season at Triple-A Albuquerque. Seager, a 20-year-old shortstop, owns a .353/.410/.630 slash line with 18 home runs and 71 RBI in 86 games between High-A Rancho Cucamonga and Double-A Chattanooga. Urias, a 17-year-old left-hander from Mexico, has registered a 2.77 ERA, 1.17 WHIP, and 134 strikeouts over his first 113 2/3 innings as a professional.

To call that a massive return package would be an understatement. It’s pretty clear now that Hamels — who is under contract with the Phillies through the 2018 season — is probably going to be staying put.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.