Brandon Belt is making progress from his concussion, but Hector Sanchez needs more time

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Some encouraging news and some less-than-good news for the Giants this evening.

Andrew Baggarly of CSNBayArea.com passes along word that first baseman Brandon Belt passed a concussion test and could begin working out today. Meanwhile, catcher Hector Sanchez failed his and will now have to wait another three or four days.

Belt suffered his concussion after he was hit in the face by a thrown ball during batting practice last Saturday. He wasn’t feeling any improvement as of a few days ago, so today is an important step in the right direction. The 26-year-old has already missed two months this season due to a broken thumb, but he could be a major contributor down the stretch if he can stay on the field.

Sanchez landed on the 7-day concussion disabled list after he was hit in the mask by a foul tip on Friday. The Giants are currently going with rookie Andrew Susac as Buster Posey’s backup catcher.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.