Before and after: Dmitri Young lost a TON of weight

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During his 13-year MLB career Dmitri Young was one of the largest players in baseball, often struggling with his weight while being listed at 6-foot-2, 295 pounds.

Now he’s 40 years old and Young not only slimmed down in an effort to deal with his diabetes, the man nicknamed “Da Meat Hook” shocked people with how skinny he looks while saying hello to some friends at the Reds-Nationals game in Cincinnati game over the weekend.

Dan Steinberg of the Washington Post passes along quotes from a radio interview in which Young said he’s currently 205 pounds and “did it the right way” by “doing a lot of cardio” and then, once some of the weight came off, “working out” more seriously.

As someone who lost 150 pounds a few years ago and has been up and down several times since then, I commend Young on going with the diet-and-exercise route. It’s the hard way, but it’s also the most rewarding way and, hopefully in his case, the way to long-term success.

(Also, for a guy who dropped nearly 100 pounds that’s a pretty cool bacon shirt he’s wearing in the picture.)

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.