Josh Harrison escaped yet another run-down

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Josh Harrison is quickly climbing the list of must-watch players. The Pirates’ super-utilityman and National League All-Star dipped and dived his way out of a rundown in the tenth inning against the Mets on June 27, though he did not score. The next inning, he belted a walk-off RBI double.

Harrison has done it again. The speedster deftly avoided Rockies catcher Wilin Rosario’s tag in a run-down in the sixth inning of today’s game in Colorado. The Pirates had already plated two to begin the top of the sixth against Rockies starter Tommy Kahnle thanks to a game-tying two-run home run from Travis Snider. Harrison then reached on a single to shallow center.

With Gregory Polanco at the plate, Harrison stole second base. Only one problem: he overslid the base and shortstop Josh Rutledge was guarding the return path. That’s when the action began:

Harrison would later score on an Ike Davis double to give the Pirates a 5-4 lead. In the eighth inning, Harrison broke a 5-5 tie, hitting a solo home run to right center. He finished 4-for-6 with an RBI single, a double, the solo home run, and two stolen bases in the Pirates’ 7-5 win. The guy is a heap of fun to watch.

Harrison has a .294/.330/.447 slash line with six home runs, 33 RBI, and 12 stolen bases in 302 plate appearances this season.

Report: Brodie Van Wagenen issuing managerial orders from home

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Mike Puma of the New York Post reports that Mets GM Brodie Van Wagenen has been issuing managerial orders from home. Citing an anonymous industry source, Van Wagenen made the call to remove Jacob deGrom from his June 1 start against the Diamondbacks in the seventh inning due to a hip cramp. deGrom was visibly frustrated with his removal.

According to Puma’s source, Van Wagenen was watching the game on TV at home. He communicated with a member of the team support staff that deGrom should be removed from the game. Word got to Callaway, who went to the mound and took out his starter. Furthermore, some in the Mets’ clubhouse were miffed that Van Wagenen didn’t take credit for the decision because it looked like deGrom and Callaway were at odds with each other.

Puma also notes that the decision to limit closer Edwin Díaz’s innings is also Van Wagenen’s. Díaz was not used in Sunday’s loss against the Cubs. Javier Báez ended up hitting a go-ahead three-run home run off of Seth Lugo. Callaway was questioned for choice not to use Díaz after the game, which resulted in a brouhaha in the clubhouse.

A veteran executive of another team said that a GM issuing managerial directives would be “unusual” and “crossing the line.” He added, “I have never seen that done, personally.”

Van Wagenen insisted, “Mickey has control of baseball decisions.”

In a season marked by dysfunction, things may be even more dysfunctional within the Mets organization than we knew.