28 teams attended workout for Cuban defector Rusney Castillo

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We learned last weekend that the Cubs, White Sox, Braves, and Giants were among the clubs interested in Cuban outfielder Rusney Castillo. However, it looks like they are going to have plenty of competition in order to sign him.

Castillo defected from Cuba earlier this year and is known for his plus-speed. Listed at 5-foot-9 and 185 pounds, the 27-year-old hits from the right side of the plate. Per Jesse Sanchez of MLB.com, scouts have compared him to the likes of Jacoby Ellsbury, Kenny Lofton, and Brett Gardner. He was expected to work out at both center field and shortstop today.

Here’s video of Castillo preparing for today’s showcase. It’s mostly boring stuff, but you’ll see that he’s capable of pushing an SUV:

[mlbvideo id=”34630127″ width=”400″ height=”224″ /]

Castillo is represented by Jay Z’s Roc Nation Sports. Because he played five years in Cuba’s top professional league, he will not be subject to MLB’s international spending limit. There’s some thought that he could surface in the majors by the end of this season depending on where he winds up.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.