And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

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Royals 2, Indians 1: Corey Kluber deserved a better fate than a no-decision after he went nine innings, allowing only two hits and one unearned run and striking out 10 (and Oh My God that unearned run …) But heck, I guess it’s better than the loss he was poised to take before the Tribe managed to scratch out a run in the ninth against Greg Holland. Eventually it went 14 innings and ended with a Nori Aoki walkoff single. The affair lasted four hours, 23 minutes. In all, 397 pitches were thrown.

Phillies 2, Giants 1: Cole Hamels was dominant, striking out 10 and allowing only one run over eight innings. In other news, Ryan Howard sat against a righty he’s totally owned during his career (.328/.425/.687). I mean, I get platooning or even benching Howard, but if you’re not going to start him against Tim Hudson of all people, who do you start him against?

Blue Jays 8, Red Sox 0: Marcus Stroman took a no-no into the seventh. And, while he couldn’t finish that off, he was still outstanding, with the hit he allowed to Shane Victorino being the only one he allowed. Meanwhile, Jays bats were not at all baffled by Rubby De La Rosa, touching him for seven runs on nine hits in four. Juan Francisco drove in four.

Marlins 3, Braves 2: A joint Craig Kimbrel/Evan Gattis, well, not a meltdown, but a failure in the ninth. Kimbrel struck out one guy and had the second guy struck out but Gattis couldn’t handle strike three, allowing the batter to reach first. Then he went to second on a wild pitch. Then he scored on an RBI single. If Kimbrel and Gattis clean it up the game probably goes to extras. As it was, the Marlins took three of four in Turner Field. Which doesn’t happen too darn often.

Yankees 4, Rangers 2: Brandon McCarthy had his third straight solid outing since joining the Yankees, allowing one run over six innings. The Rangers are now 3-17 in the month of July.

Padres 13, Cubs 3: Tyson Ross struck out 11 and the Padres lineup — which looked like a list of guys in witness protection — exploded for 13. Nine runs coming in the sixth inning. Rene Rivera had three hits, including a homer while driving in three. Will Venable, Alexi Amarista and Chris Nelson each drove in two. Easily the best night at the plate of the season for the friars.

Athletics 13, Astros 1: The A’s, on the other hand, are used to blowing teams out. Brandon Moss hit a grand slam. Jeff Samardzija allowed one run on five his over eight. He’d go a month without this kind of run support when he was in Chicago.

Brewers 9, Mets 1: Yet another blowout on Thursday. Matt Garza, who was shelled and sent to the showers early in his previous start, allowed only one run over eight innings. Homers for Jonathan Lucroy, Khris Davis and Ryan Braun.

White Sox 5, Twins 2: Lots of blowouts yesterday but lots of nice pitching performances too. Another one came from Hector Noesi, who allowed allowed two runs on three hits over seven and two-thirds. He was backed up by Adam Eaton who was 3 for 5 with two RBI and a double.

Tigers 6, Angels 4: Max Scherzer won his fourth straight decision, besting Garrett Richards. Nick Castellanos drove in the tying and go-ahead run in the sixth. Scherzer is now tied for the league lead in wins and is 4-0 with a 2.21 ERA in his last six starts.

Orioles 4, Mariners 0: And another nice start: Wie-Yen Chen shut out the M’s for eight innings, allowing only five hits. He was backed by a Delmon Young three-run homer.

Sports teams do not “heal” cities or nations

Associated Press
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Bob Nightengale of USA Today has a story today in which he talks to Cleon Jones, Ken Harrelson, Art Shamsky and others from the 1969 Mets about their Amazin’ World Series title run. The story is tied to the upcoming commemorations of the 50th anniversary of that phenomenally unexpected and improbable season.

And that’s fine as far as it goes, but as so often is the case with nostalgic remembrances, it goes too far:

They will gather together in New York later in June, rehashing stories from 50 years ago, reminiscing about the year they turned the baseball world upside down, becoming perhaps the most beloved team in history.

The 1969 Mets.

The team that helped revitalize a city in ruins and heal a nation in turmoil, showing the world you can turn the inconceivable to the improbable to the possible to the incredible, in a way only sports can possibly do.

Now would be a good time to remember that the city the Mets allegedly revitalized found itself on the brink of bankruptcy in the early-to-mid-70s and experienced urban decay and spiking crime rates for the next 20+ years. It would also be a good time to remember that the nation the Mets allegedly healed witnessed the Kent State shootings a few months later, among other bits of strife for the next, oh, 50 years and counting.

Yes, I am being flip and superficial here, but I do so simply to illustrate how flip and superficial “[Sports Team] healed [City/Nation]” narratives invariably are.

We see these sorts of things whenever a team from a down-on-its-luck place has a title run. Detroit. Cleveland. New Orleans. The idea is generally a broad-brush paint job in which the source of strife — poverty, crime, economic strife, natural disaster, terrorism, etc. —  is detailed with the local sports team’s subsequent title run cast as a spiritual balm. The words “heal” and “uplift” are pretty common in these stories. Back in 2002 I wrote about a classic of the genre, a documentary about the 1968 Detroit Tigers, who allegedly healed Detroit following he 1967 riots. Anyone familiar with Detroit from 1968-on may understand that the claims of healing asserted therein were . . . somewhat overstated.

Whatever the details, most of these narratives have the same sorts of flaws. At best they overstate the significance of sports in society, presuming that happiness among ticket-buying sports fans — who are usually better off than your average city resident who may be the one in need of healing — means broad-based happiness among the populace. More commonly they simply ignore the actual city or society beyond anything but its most superficial markers. The pattern:

  • Montage of the strife in whatever its form (bonus if it’s from the 1960s and you can re-use some existing “turbulent 60s” b-roll;
  • A chronicling of the sports team’s run; and
  • A declaration that everything was better after that.

It’s not even a matter of correlation and causation being confused. There’s very rarely ever any evidence presented that the sports made the underlying problems any better. All one usually gets from these things is a sense that, at least to the sports commentator/documentarian telling the story and to the people who closely followed the sports team, things were good. Unless, of course, I missed the part about how LeBron James solved Cleveland’s declining population problems and how the 2010 New Orleans Saints solved the ongoing mental, economic and medical trauma of those displaced by Katrina.

Which is not to say that sports mean nothing in this context. Sports success can certainly make a lot of people happy, even people hit hard by adversity, temporarily speaking. People only tangentially-connected to the strife in question may, also, decide that a sporting event “healed” a city. For example, if something bad happened in your city but didn’t affect you directly, you may believe that the trophy-hoisting put a nice bookend on the trauma that was more directly felt by others. And, of course, individuals directly connected with the sporting events in question, like Cleon Jones in the Mets piece, can experience a more lasting change in their lives as a result of this sort of success that they might see as general uplift.

That’s not the same thing as healing, though. Because while you or I can close that chapter on it all when the game is over, survivors of traumatic events and victims of systematic oppression or chronic strife cannot and do not do so that easily. There were people still hurting in Detroit after 1968, in New York (and the nation) after 1969, in New Orleans after the Saints won the Super Bowl, and in Cleveland after the Cavs won their title. The very best that can be said of sports triumph amid civic adversity is that it’s a pleasant, albeit temporary distraction. But not everyone had the luxury of enjoying that temporary distraction and a distraction is not the same thing as a cure.

Why do sports writers and commentators do this? I suppose it’s a function of people believing that the world in which they operate is, well, the world. The entertainment writer sees everything as a Hollywood story, the political writer sees everything as a Washington story and the sports writer sees everything as a sports story. It’s an understandable loss of perspective and we all fall prey to it sometimes.

It’d be better, though, if we spent more time appreciating that our perspective on the world is not the only one. I won’t speak for the entertainment or political people, and I won’t speak for the way in which any other person may prioritize the world as they observe it. But in my world — sports — I think it’d be better if we did not ascribe outsized significance to the beat we cover. Doing so asks far more of sports than sports is capable of delivering and erases the ongoing pain and suffering of people for whom sports is no sort of cure.