Video: Anthony Rizzo falls into the camera well to make a catch, rule 7.04(c) invoked

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Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo made a terrific catch in the bottom of the sixth inning on Sunday against the Diamondbacks, and also gave everybody a chance to brush up on rule 7.04(c).

The Diamondbacks had put runners on the corners with one out in the bottom of the sixth inning of a 1-1 ballgame against Cubs starter Jake Arrieta. Hill popped up a first-pitch fastball into foul territory on the first base side. Rizzo ranged over and snagged the ball before spilling over the fence into the camera well.

Rule 7.04(c) states that:

If a fielder, after having made a legal catch, should fall into a stand or among spectators or into the dugout or any other out-of-play area while in possession of the ball after making a legal catch, or fall while in the dugout after making a legal catch, the ball is dead and each runner shall advance one base, without liability to be put out, from his last legally touched base at the time the fielder fell into, or in, such out-of-play area.

As a result, Drew Peralta was allowed to score to give the Diamondbacks a 2-1 lead and Miguel Montero advanced to second base. It turned out to be a vital play as the Cubs went on to lose by a 3-2 margin.

Video of the play:

[mlbvideo id=”34670487″ width=”600″ height=”336″ /]

Prior to the catch, Rizzo had broken a scoreless tie with a solo home run off of Josh Collmenter in the top of the sixth inning. He now has 23 homers along with 53 RBI and a .281/.384/.522 slash line. The Cubs received Rizzo in the trade that sent Andrew Cashner to the Padres back in January 2012.

Nationals back off of minor league stipend cut

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Yesterday it was reported that the Washington Nationals would cut the weekly stipend paid to their minor leaguers from $400 a week to $300 per week through the end of June.

For frame of reference, MLB had agreed to pay all minor leaguers $400 per week through May 31. Several teams have agreed to extend that, with the Royals and Twins agreeing to do it all the way through the end of August. The Oakland A’s decided to stop the payments in their entirety as of today. The Nationals were unique in cutting $100 off of the checks.

The A’s and the Nationals have taken a great amount of flak for what they’ve done. The Nats move was immediately countered by Nationals major league players announcing that they would cover what the organization would not.

The A’s are, apparently, still sticking to their plan. The Nats, however, have reversed course:

One can easily imagine a situation in which Nats ownership just decided, cold-heartedly, to lop that hundred bucks off of each minor league check and not worry about a moment longer. What’s harder to imagine is what seems to have actually happened: the Nats did it without realizing that anyone would take issue with it, were surprised by the blowback, and then reversed course. Like, what kind of a bubble where they living in that they did not think people would consider that a low-rent thing to do?

In any event, good move, Nats, even if I cannot even begin to comprehend your thought process.