Blue Jays, Giants “taking their best shot” at Chase Utley

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Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe drops the following blurb in his weekly Sunday notes column

Chase Utley, 2B, Phillies — Right now it doesn’t appear that Utley is going anywhere because he can invoke his 10-5 rights and it looks as if he wants to remain in Philadelphia. But there’s time. And it hasn’t stopped teams such as the Blue Jays and Giants from taking their best shot, and they likely will through the end of the month.

Toronto second basemen — a mix of Steve Tolleson, Brett Lawrie, Munenori Kawasaki, Ryan Goins, and a couple others — have posted a combined .254/.312/.365 batting line this season. And the Giants just got Marco Scutaro back from the disabled list but can’t count on him to play every day and stay healthy.

Utley is hitting .289/.347/.441 with eight home runs and 46 RBI in 93 games this season at age 35. “I guess we’d have to see at that point,” he told MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki in late June when asked about the possibility of being shopped at the July 31 trade deadline. “But I don’t plan on going anywhere.”

Utley is making $15 million this season, owed $15 million next season, and holds $15 million vesting options for the 2016-2018 campaigns. They vest if he reaches 500 plate appearances in the year previous.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.