The guy who’s safe is out. The guy who’s out is safe.

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In the first inning of Friday’s Brewers-Nationals game, Anthony Rendon hit a grounder to short with Denard Span running from first on the pitch. Span beat the relay to second and was called safe, but Rendon was easily retired at first on the play.

At least, that’s how it seemed to go down.

After originally calling Span out, second base umpire Angel Campos changed his mind and ruled Span out, seemingly declaring that his popup slide interfered with Scooter Gennett’s relay to first base. And he probably had a case… Span had no need to stand up as quickly as he did, and if he had actually forced Gennett to alter his throw in any way, interference would have made a ton of sense.

Span, though, didn’t get in the path of the ball. And Gennett had no problem completing the relay, as evidenced by the fact that Rendon was easily retired at first. So, with Span also out, the ruling on the field was that of a double play.

Of course, Matt Williams was none too happy with this. But there was nothing reviewable he could challenge. Fortunately, the umps got together to discuss things, and what ended up happening was that Span was still ruled out — unintentional interference being the official call — and Rendon was credited with first base, since Span’s interference created a deadball situation.

So, when all was said and done, the guy who was safe was out and the guy who was out was safe.

Mike Trout has been really good at baseball lately

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“Water wet,” “Sky blue,” “Dog bites man” and “Mike Trout good” are not exactly newsworthy sentiments, but once in a while you have to state the obvious just so you can look back later and make sure you were, in the moment, aware of the obvious.

And to be fair, “Mike Trout good” is underselling the Angels outfielder lately. He’s on the greatest tear of his great career lately, and dang it, that’s worthy of a few words on this blog.

Last night Trout went a mere 1-for-1, but that’s because the Diamondbacks were smart enough not to pitch to him too much, walking him twice. There was no one on base the first time he came up and he got a free pass. There was a guy on first but two outs the second time, so he was once again not given much to hit and took his base again. Arizona was not so lucky the third time. The bases were loaded and there was nowhere to put Trout. He smacked the first pitch he saw for a two-run single. They probably shoulda just walked him anyway, limiting the damage to one. The last time up he reached on catcher’s interference. Maybe Arizona figured that literally grabbing the bat from him with a catcher’s mitt was the best bet?

If so you can’t blame them, really. Not with the month he’s had. In June, Trout is hitting .448/.554/.776 with five homers. He currently leads the league in the following categories: home runs (23), runs (60), walks (64), on-base percentage (.469), OPS (1.158) OPS+ (219), total bases (179) and intentional walks (9). He currently has a bWAR of 6.5. WAR, in case you did not know, is a cumulative stat. When he won the 2014 MVP Award, he “only” had 7.6 for the entire year.

Sadly, one man does not a team make, so the Angels are only 9-8 in the month of June and have fallen far back of the red-hot Houston Astros and Seattle Mariners in the division race. For this reason I suspect a lot of people are going to do what they’ve long done and overlook Mike Trout’s sheer dominance or, even more ridiculously, claim he is overrated or something (believe me, I’ve seen it even this month).

Feel free to ignore those people and concentrate instead on the greatest baseball player in the game today, who has somehow managed to up his game in recent weeks.