Pete Rose wants PED users in the Hall of Fame to help his own chances

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Pete Rose has historically slammed PED users. Saying stuff like this back in 2010:

Now, to answer your question about steroids, wouldn’t you like to ask Roger Maris how he feels about steroids? Or Babe Ruth how he feels about steroids? Or Hank Aaron, you could probably ask how he feels about steroids. Because those guys all lost records because of people who supposedly took steroids. So that’s a different deal right there. But I didn’t alter any statistics of baseball.

I may be bad, but not as bad as them, he has argued. I think that may be a tactical thing on his part — in the past he has also acknowledged that guys like Barry Bonds were great players regardless — and that he’d say just about anything to get himself reinstated or considered for the Hall of Fame. More evidence to that effect comes today, as he has now begun advocating for PED users in the Hall. Here he is on WFAN this morning:

Pete Rose wants Major League Baseball to give him a second chance. That’s no big secret.And he thinks he’d have a better shot at reinstatement if Hall of Fame voters can find it in themselves to induct a tainted slugger or two.

“I wish that would happen,” Rose said Monday on WFAN’s “Boomer & Carton” show. “If something like that would ever happen, it would enhance my opportunities.”

Any weapon at hand, I guess.

For what it’s worth I want the PED guys AND Pete Rose in the Hall of Fame. History is history and baseball is baseball. Let’s leave the ethics discussions for the ethicists and lets put the truly historic players in the Hall of Fame.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.