Mark Appel was a mess last night (and all year) at Single-A

26 Comments

Astros prospect Mark Appel had seemingly gotten on track after a rough, injury plagued start to his second pro season, putting together a decent stretch of games at Single-A, but the No. 1 pick in the 2013 draft got knocked around in a big way last night.

Appel failed to make it out of the fifth inning while allowing seven runs on 13 hits and his season totals at high Single-A now include a 9.57 ERA in 10 starts with a .376 opponents’ batting average and 1.030 OPS against.

Appel has just 75 career innings under his belt since being drafted out of Stanford, but he turns 23 years old next week and almost everyone figured he’d be at least knocking on the door to the majors by now. Instead he’s struggling–and that’s probably putting it very kindly–at high Single-A.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images
2 Comments

Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.