Babe Ruth made his major league debut 100 years ago today

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On July 11, 1914, the Boston Red Sox gave a 19 year-old pitcher the start. They had just purchased his contract from the minor league Baltimore Orioles a week before. The delay in getting to Boston was due to the Sox being on a road trip down to Washington. There was no rush to get him on a train, so he cooled his heels for a few days. No need to change plans for some kid named Babe Ruth.

Ruth would tell people later that, that very morning, he met his future wife, Helen Woodford, when she served him in a coffee shop. Others have cast doubt on this. Regardless of the truth, it was a big day for the guy, both in reality and in his memory years later.

That afternoon Ruth made his big league debut. He pitched seven innings, allowing two runs on three hits and picked up the win. He only struck out one guy, though. Which was the same number of times he struck out while batting, as he posted an 0 for 2 day. He lost his next start and after that wasn’t used by the Sox all that much, pitching in only five games all year. The Red Sox weren’t really the big news in Boston that year anyway. The Braves won the World Series and became something of a sensation in doing so.

Ruth would have a handful of better days ahead. In the meantime, here’s the box score from the game which launched a legend.

 

Dustin Pedroia going back on injured list

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Welp, that didn’t last long. Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia is going back on the injured list with more knee issues. If it matters the Sox say it’s not a big deal and they expect him back sooner rather than later, but they also said that his post-2017 knee surgery was just a “cleanup” at first and that basically cost him a year. So.

Pedroia has played in six games and is 2-for-20 with a walk.

I don’t think it’s hyperbole to say that Pedroia’s career may be nearing an end. Sure, he’s under contract for two more years after this season, but he’s also in a unfortunate spiral that so many players experience in their mid-to-late 30s.

Running a website like this makes it all the clearer, actually. When you search a player’s name in our CMS, you get every post in which he appears in reverse chronological order. Just about every long-tenured player ends with about six posts in which he is alternately placed on and activated from the disabled/injured list. Then an offseason link to a big feature in which he’s written about as being “at a crossroads” followed by something vague about “resuming baseball activities” and then, inevitably, the retirement announcement. I can’t count the number of guys whose careers I can tick off in that way by browsing the guts of this site.

I hope that’s not the case for Pedroia. I hope that there’s a “Pedroia wins Comeback Player of the Year” post in the future. Or at the very least a silly “Miller’s Crossing” reference in an “And that Happened” in which I say “the old man’s still an artist with the Thompson” after he peppers the ball around in some 3-for-4, two-double game. I want that stuff to happen.

It’s just that, if you watch this game long enough, you realize how unlikely that is once a player starts to break down.