Chris Sale and Anthony Rizzo make the All-Star team via the “Final Vote” competition

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For the past couple of years Major League Baseball has run a little American Idol-style contest to give players who didn’t make the All-Star team a chance to make it. It’s called The Final Vote, and it gives fans a few days to vote online and through social media for one of five finalists. It’s a program that encourages campaigns and hashtags and all kinds of nonsense which, for the most part is kind of fun, even if it clogs up our Twitter feeds for a couple of days.

But now the Final Vote is over and the results are in:

The creative campaigns are over. Twitter voting ended in a furious rally. And at the end of the four-day online voting program, it is Chris Sale of the Chicago White Sox and Anthony Rizzo of the Chicago Cubs who were chosen by fans as the winners of the 2014 All-Star Game MLB.com Final Vote Sponsored by Experian. Sale and Rizzo earned the final two AL and NL All-Star Team roster spots through online voting on MLB.com, the individual Club sites and Twitter, where designated player hashtags counted during the final six hours of voting.

Rizzo beat out Justin Morneau, even though Morneau had the entire nation of Canada behind him. Of course, in a battle between Canadian democracy and Chicago politics, take Chicago every time.

That may explain Chris Sale’s win too. I mean, set aside the fact that he totally deserves to be on the All-Star team. Clearly his victory over Garrett Richards was a function of The Chicago Way. Richards belongs too, of course. I would assume that an “injury” to a current All-Star will get him there. It always seems to happen that way.

Brewers to give Mike Moustakas a look at second base

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The Brewers reportedly signed third baseman Mike Moustakas to a one-year, $10 million contract on Sunday. While the deal is not yet official, MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that the Brewers plan to give Moustakas a look at second base during spring training. If all goes well, he will be the primary second baseman and Travis Shaw will stay at third base.

The initial thought was that Moustakas would simply take over at third base for the more versatile Shaw. Moustakas has spent 8,035 of his career defensive innings at third base, 35 innings at first base, and none at second. In fact, he has never played second base as a pro player. Shaw, meanwhile, has spent 268 of his 4,073 1/3 defensive innings in the majors at second base and played there as recently as October.

This is certainly an interesting wrinkle to signing Moustakas, who is a decent third baseman. He was victimized by another slow free agent market, not signing until March last year on a $6.5 million deal with a $15 million mutual option for this season. That option was declined, obviously, and he ended up signing for $5 million cheaper here in February as the Brewers waited him out. Notably, Moustakas did not have qualifying offer compensation attached to him this time around.

Last season, between the Royals and Brewers, the 30-year-old Moustakas hit .251/.315/.459 with 28 home runs and 95 RBI in 635 plate appearances.