Joey Votto re-injures quadriceps, goes back on disabled list

11 Comments

Reds first baseman Joey Votto spent nearly a month on the disabled list with a quadriceps injury suffered in mid-May and now, after hitting just .250 with a .699 OPS in 23 games since returning, the former MVP is headed back to the disabled list with the same injury.

Cincinnati used backup catcher Brayan Pena as the primary first baseman during Votto’s previous DL stint, but he lacks any sort of offensive upside and … well, hits like a backup catcher.

Last night Pena was unavailable due to being on paternity leave, so the Reds sacrificed some defense by shifting Jay Bruce from right field to first base and used Skip Schumaker in right field.

There’s no great in-house solution to replace Votto because the Reds obviously weren’t planning to be without their $225 million franchise player for long stretches, but replacing his production this season won’t be as tough as years past. Votto has continued to get on base at a very strong clip thanks to his excellent plate discipline, but he’s hit just .255 with six homers and a .409 slugging percentage in 62 games overall and his .799 OPS is 151 points below his career mark.

At age 31 he’s being paid just $12 million this season, but Votto is owed another $213 million from 2015-2023.

Joe DiMaggio’s hitting streak ended 78 years ago today

Getty Images
Leave a comment

There’s nothing special about a 78-year anniversary. It’s not a round number or anything and we tend to like round numbers. But (a) I was reminded of this today; and (b) we have no idea if the Martians will have invaded and taken over the planet come 2021, so I feel like it’s best to run this now than wait for the 80th anniversary. Cool? Cool.

Anyway: on this day in 1941, Joe DiMaggio’s still-unbroken and possibly unbreakable (see below) 56-game hitting streak came to end. The game took place in Cleveland in front of a staggering 67,468 fans. Not bad for a Thursday night. The way the streak ended, courtesy of an ESPN Classic post from Larry Scwartz back in 2003:

Third baseman Ken Keltner makes two outstanding plays, grabbing DiMaggio smashes down the line in the first and seventh innings and throwing him out at first base. In between these at-bats, left-hander Al Smith walks DiMaggio in the fourth.

The Yankee Clipper has one more chance to extend his streak when he bats in the eighth with the bases full against Jim Bagby, a young right-hander who just enters the game. DiMaggio hits the ball sharply, but shortstop Lou Boudreau plays a bad hop perfectly and turns the grounder into a double play.

Stuff happens.

To be clear: 56 may not be broken in my lifetime or yours. It’s obviously a SUPER difficult task to string together a hitting streak of considerable length. As we saw when guys like Pete Rose or Paul Molitor or whoever have come within spitting distance of DiMaggio’s record — long spitting distance — the pressure ramps up and it’s hard to do you job with a lot of pressure. Add in the fact that simple base hits are harder to come by in today’s game than they used to be due to prevalent hitting, pitching and defensive trends, and it’d be no shocker whatsoever if no one ever does it.

But I draw the line at “unbreakable,” simply because, as noted above, stuff does happen. And because there’s nothing structural preventing it from happening. It’s not like Cy Young’s 511 wins or something which fundamental changes in the game have made basically impossible. No one is going to win 26 games a year for 20 years straight or what have you. Heck, CC Sabathia is baseball’s current gray hair among pitchers and only has a few dozen more career starts than that. It’s just a different game.

Hitters do play in 150-160 games now, though, and the good ones do average more than one hit per game. Putting them in the right arrangement may never be likely, but doing so is only a matter of stars aligning, not breaking the fundamental rules of engagement. It could happen. Maybe. Because, unlike some other records, it did before under broadly similar circumstances.

OK, that aside, I’ll offer up my favorite and most maddening DiMaggio hitting streak fact.

During his streak, which lasted from May 15-July 17, DiMaggio went 91-of-223, which is a .408 average. Between April 15-September 28 (i.e. the whole dang season) Ted Williams hit .406. And when it was all said and done he was substantially better in virtually every other batting category as well.

Joe DiMaggio won the MVP Award.