There will be self-serve beer machines at the All-Star Game

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I’m going to the All-Star Game in Minneapolis next week. When I’m there, my company expenses will be limited to flight, hotel and a modest but sufficient per diem for meals and the like. However — and while I have never really tested this because I don’t do in-depth, shoeleather reporting — I presume that NBC also has to pay for various costs associated with the production of journalistic content, right?

In other news:

Self-serve beer stations are up and running in Target Field, so Minnesota Twins fans and those who attend the Major League Baseball All-Star festivities next week can decide what they want and even how much they want of it.

Gleeman was at Target Field over the weekend and said that they basically looked like the fancy Coke dispensers you’re starting to see at various fast food restaurants. I would hope that it won’t let you mix up beers like you’d mix Fanta and Sprite because, eww, but so far, so good!

The mechanics have a lot of safeguards in it such as requiring you show ID to a real person first and get a pre-paid card with which to fill up your cup at the machines. But the bottom line:

The machine allows a customer to use the card to pour up to 48 ounces of beer every 15 minutes.

I think I could make that work. Any more details?

Bud and Bud Light will cost 38 cents an ounce, while Shock Top Lemon Shandy and Goose Island 312 Urban Pale Ale will cost 40 cents an ounce.

Welp, OK, maybe I’ll just watch other people use it while I’m on my way to some of the other beer options on-site.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.