There will be self-serve beer machines at the All-Star Game

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I’m going to the All-Star Game in Minneapolis next week. When I’m there, my company expenses will be limited to flight, hotel and a modest but sufficient per diem for meals and the like. However — and while I have never really tested this because I don’t do in-depth, shoeleather reporting — I presume that NBC also has to pay for various costs associated with the production of journalistic content, right?

In other news:

Self-serve beer stations are up and running in Target Field, so Minnesota Twins fans and those who attend the Major League Baseball All-Star festivities next week can decide what they want and even how much they want of it.

Gleeman was at Target Field over the weekend and said that they basically looked like the fancy Coke dispensers you’re starting to see at various fast food restaurants. I would hope that it won’t let you mix up beers like you’d mix Fanta and Sprite because, eww, but so far, so good!

The mechanics have a lot of safeguards in it such as requiring you show ID to a real person first and get a pre-paid card with which to fill up your cup at the machines. But the bottom line:

The machine allows a customer to use the card to pour up to 48 ounces of beer every 15 minutes.

I think I could make that work. Any more details?

Bud and Bud Light will cost 38 cents an ounce, while Shock Top Lemon Shandy and Goose Island 312 Urban Pale Ale will cost 40 cents an ounce.

Welp, OK, maybe I’ll just watch other people use it while I’m on my way to some of the other beer options on-site.

Jim Crane thought the heat over sign-stealing would blow over by spring training

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The Astros’ sign-stealing story broke in November, a steady drumbeat of coverage of it lasted through December and into January, when Rob Manfred’s report came out about it. The report was damning and, in its wake, Houston’s manager and general manger were both suspended and then fired.

After that a steady stream of media reports came out which not only made the whole affair seem even worse than Manfred’s report suggested, but which also suggested that, on some level, Major League Baseball had bungled it all and it was even worse than it had first seemed.

Rather than Manfred and the Astros putting this all behind them, the story grew. As it grew, both the Red Sox and Mets fired their managers and, in a few isolated media appearances, Astros’ players seemed ill-prepared for questions on it all. Once spring training began the Astros made even worse public appearances and, for the past week and change, each day has given us a new player or three angrily speaking out about how mad they are at the Astros and how poorly they’ve handled all of this.

Why have they handled it so poorly? As always, look to poor leadership:

Guess not.

In other news, Crane was — and I am not making this up — recently named the Houston Sports Executive of the Year. An award he has totally, totally earned, right?