A Washington Nationals radio guy explains how, when you die, your cat will eat you.

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A couple of weeks ago Marty Brennaman really brought us down when he took a sharp, serious turn during a broadcast and explained to us all that his greatest fear was dying alone in a hotel room. On Wednesday, Nationals radio guy Phil Wood decided that he needed to get real too.

During the rain delay the subject of dogs vs. cats came up. Wood explained why he’d go with a dog:

“Well, I became more of a dog person when I read that, if you have a cat, and you die, your cat will eventually eat you. So, it’s just their nature, apparently . . . so, again, if that helps you make up your mind at all, on whether or not you’re a dog or a cat person . . .”

His co-hosts, Charlie Slowes and Dave Jageler, were somewhat stunned. Jageler said “well, thanks for that.”

In other news, I’m beginning to think that the job of baseball radio guy is a really, really lonely one.

Listen to the macabre exchange here. If you need me, I’ll be off filling my cat’s bowl with 100 pounds of cat food in case I take a nasty slip and fall before my kids are back home on Monday.

Aaron Judge has a “pretty significant strain” of his oblique

Aaron Judge
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In case you missed it over the weekend, the New York Yankees suffered yet another huge blow when another huge star went on the injured list. The star: Aaron Judge, who strained his oblique during Saturday’s 9-2 win over the Royals.

Yesterday the Yankees placed him on the injured list. In so doing, Yankees manager Aaron Boone called it a “pretty significant strain in there.” The team did not offer a timeline, but Boone said they’ll monitor Judge for a couple of weeks to see where he is. Oblique strains, however, can cause a player to miss a lot of time. Four to six weeks is not unheard of for even moderate oblique strains. Guys with major strains have missed months.

Judge is the Yankees’ 13th player currently on the injured list and is the 14th Yankees player to visit it overall on the young season. Joining him there at the moment :

It’s an All-Star team’s worth of injuries. It’s such a good group of players that Ellsbury couldn’t even make the starting lineup of the all-injured team.

Though we often ignore it in season-long narratives of successful and unsuccessful teams, choosing to focus on great or poor performances, the fact of the matter is that team health is almost always a big, big factor in who wins and who loses. No one is going to cry for the Yankees here, of course, but at some point there are just too many injuries to overcome. One has to wonder if New York has reached that point yet.