A Washington Nationals radio guy explains how, when you die, your cat will eat you.

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A couple of weeks ago Marty Brennaman really brought us down when he took a sharp, serious turn during a broadcast and explained to us all that his greatest fear was dying alone in a hotel room. On Wednesday, Nationals radio guy Phil Wood decided that he needed to get real too.

During the rain delay the subject of dogs vs. cats came up. Wood explained why he’d go with a dog:

“Well, I became more of a dog person when I read that, if you have a cat, and you die, your cat will eventually eat you. So, it’s just their nature, apparently . . . so, again, if that helps you make up your mind at all, on whether or not you’re a dog or a cat person . . .”

His co-hosts, Charlie Slowes and Dave Jageler, were somewhat stunned. Jageler said “well, thanks for that.”

In other news, I’m beginning to think that the job of baseball radio guy is a really, really lonely one.

Listen to the macabre exchange here. If you need me, I’ll be off filling my cat’s bowl with 100 pounds of cat food in case I take a nasty slip and fall before my kids are back home on Monday.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.