And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Sorry, for reasons that are unimportant I wasn’t able to do a full And That Happened this morning. I hope and pray you’ll survive.

I do have time to note, however, that Rick Porcello’s shutout — his second consecutive shutout — was quite the thing. No walks, no strikeouts. Which is not something that happens too terribly often. Indeed, the last time it happened in the big leagues was 1989, when Jeff Ballard did it.

I’ll also note that Tim Lincecum followed up his no-hitter with an eight shutout innings performance. Contrast this to last year’s no-no followup in which he gave up so many hits and runs the box score had to be expressed in scientific notation.

The rest of today’s HardballTalk day will be business as usual. In the meantime, last night’s results:

Tigers 3, Athletics 0
Giants 5, Cardinals 0
Nationals 7, Rockies 1
Blue Jays 4, Brewers 1
Pirates 3, Diamondbacks 2
Angels 8, White Sox 4; Angels 7, White Sox 5
Braves 5, Mets 4
Orioles 8, Rangers 3
Marlins 5, Phillies 4
Rays 2, Yankees 1
Indians 10, Dodgers 3
Padres 8, Reds 2
Cubs 2, Red Sox 1
Twins 10, Royals 2
Mariners 13, Astros 2

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.