The Rockies gave up three runs on one of the worst plays you’ll ever see

32 Comments

Things haven’t been going well for the Rockies lately. They’re in the midst of a four-game losing streak and are 7-17 since May 25, falling from five games over .500 to five games under. The implosion continued in Saturday afternoon’s game against the Brewers.

Trailing 5-2, Rockies starter Christian Friedrich loaded the bases with one out against opposing pitcher Wily Peralta. Friedrich fired a 91 MPH fastball that catcher Michael McKenry just plain missed. The ball kicked off of the backstop and rolled about halfway up the first base line. Aramis Ramirez scampered towards home plate. McKenry corralled the ball and tossed it to Friedrich covering home plate, but the throw sailed wide of Friedrich’s glove towards the visitors’ dugout. Friedrich chased after it as Mark Reynolds scored the second run on the play.

Jean Segura, who now was standing on third base, noticed Friedrich and McKenry weren’t paying attention, so he crept off of the bag before dashing home. Friedrich dove for the tag, but Segura slid into home plate safely for run number three of the play, four of the inning, and eight of the game.

Watch the play in all its ugliness:

Friedrich was charged with a wild pitch, and McKenry was charged with a throwing error on the play. It was one of four errors the Rockies have committed. They made three errors in the second inning, leading to the Brewers’ first four runs.

MLB’s Twitter account has some trivia:

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

Getty Images
4 Comments

Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.