Logan Morrison got into a fight with a baseball bat. The bat won.

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Logan Morrison popped out with runners on base in the fifth inning of yesterday’s M’s-Rangers game. He got mad at himself. Then he got mad at his bat. Specifically, he slammed the bat against the dugout wall. The bat shattered and a piece of it flew back at him, hitting him above the eye. He had to leave the game and required five stitches. John Buck — who has never played first base before — had to take over.

Not the smartest and most mature move of all time, and Morrison seemed to know it after the game. From Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times:

“Obviously I acted like a 3-year-old,” he said. “I apologized to my teammates. I’m about to go apologize to Mac. I can’t do that. I didn’t want to come out of the game. They saw me gushing blood from my eyebrow and they took me out. I’m embarrassed. No matter how bad I’m playing, I can’t do that . . . I usually don’t snap,” he said. “I usually don’t play this bad, either. But I usually don’t snap.”

I suppose that’s better than punching a concrete wall and breaking your hand. Which several players have done in the past.

Morrison is, presumably, day-to-day.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.