Logan Morrison got into a fight with a baseball bat. The bat won.

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Logan Morrison popped out with runners on base in the fifth inning of yesterday’s M’s-Rangers game. He got mad at himself. Then he got mad at his bat. Specifically, he slammed the bat against the dugout wall. The bat shattered and a piece of it flew back at him, hitting him above the eye. He had to leave the game and required five stitches. John Buck — who has never played first base before — had to take over.

Not the smartest and most mature move of all time, and Morrison seemed to know it after the game. From Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times:

“Obviously I acted like a 3-year-old,” he said. “I apologized to my teammates. I’m about to go apologize to Mac. I can’t do that. I didn’t want to come out of the game. They saw me gushing blood from my eyebrow and they took me out. I’m embarrassed. No matter how bad I’m playing, I can’t do that . . . I usually don’t snap,” he said. “I usually don’t play this bad, either. But I usually don’t snap.”

I suppose that’s better than punching a concrete wall and breaking your hand. Which several players have done in the past.

Morrison is, presumably, day-to-day.

Diamondbacks, T.J. McFarland avoid arbitration

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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports that the Diamondbacks and reliever T.J. McFarland have avoided arbitration, agreeing on a $1.45 million salary for the 2019 season. McFarland, in his third of four years of arbitration eligibility, filed for $1.675 million while the Diamondbacks countered at $1.275 million. McFarland ended up settling for just under the midpoint of those two figures.

McFarland, 29, was terrific out of the bullpen for the D-Backs last season, finishing with a 2.00 ERA and a 42/22 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. While the lefty may not miss a lot of bats, he does induce quite a few grounders. His 67.9 percent ground ball rate last season was the third highest among relievers with at least 50 innings, trailing only Brad Ziegler (71.1%) and Scott Alexander (70.6%).

McFarland was dominant against left-handed hitters, limiting them to a .388 OPS last season, but the D-Backs deployed him nearly twice as often against right-handed hitters, who posted an aggregate .764 OPS against him. It will be interesting to see if the club decides to use him more as a platoon reliever in 2019.