Don’t invite Robin Yount to play in an old-timer’s game

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Hall of Famer Robin Yount has some very strong feelings on Old Timers Games. He hates them. Will never play in them and says “I ain’t playin’ so don’t ask me to come.

His comments can be read at length in Bob Wolfley’s column at the Journal-Sentinel today. His basic argument: kids will be confused seeing players who were supposed to be really good stumbling around the diamond trying to play in their 60s and 70s. And that would be bad for the kids, etc.

Which, OK, but I think he underestimates kids a great deal. When I was a kid I’d see some old Detroit Tigers players in uniform hitting fungoes or something and my uncle would tell me that so-and-so played in the 50s or 60s. I was able to process it pretty well. I think the kids today could handle seeing old Robin Young lumbering around too if he’d just relax a little and have some fun.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.