Scott Van Slyke is thriving next to the Dodgers’ big-name, high-priced outfielders

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There’s been lots of talk about the Dodgers having four big-name outfielders for three starting spots, but while everyone debates how manager Don Mattingly should divvy up the playing time among Matt Kemp, Yasiel Puig, Carl Crawford, and Andre Ethier a different outfielder has been the most productive in the bunch.

In what is admittedly limited playing time of 90 plate appearances facing primarily left-handed pitching, Scott Van Slyke has hit .278 with six homers, five doubles, and a 1.060 OPS. By comparison, Puig has a 1.014 OPS and the none of the other three big-name outfielders are above a .750 OPS.

Van Slyke’s strong production dates back further than this season, too. Last year in 152 plate appearances for the Dodgers he posted an .807 OPS that ranked third on the team behind Hanley Ramirez and Puig, and his numbers in the minors include a .330 batting average with 31 homers, 55 doubles, and a 1.009 OPS in 171 games at Triple-A.

Van Slyke can hit and at age 27 he deserves an extended look to see exactly how good he could be in a full-time role, but he picked just about the worst situation possible in which to potentially get that extended look. So he’ll have to settle for posting big numbers in small playing time for now.

Dan Patrick Show: Don Mattingly talks Dodgers’ chemistry issues

Dale Murphy’s son hit in eye by rubber bullet during protest

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Atlanta Braves legend Dale Murphy took to Twitter last night and talked about his son, who was injured while taking part in a protest in Denver.

Murphy said his son nearly lost his eye after he was hit in the face by a rubber bullet while peacefully marching. He later shared a photo (see below). “Luckily, his eye was saved due to a kind stranger that was handing out goggles to protestors shortly before the shooting and another kind stranger that drove him to the ER,” Murphy said.

Murphy had far more to say about the protests, however, than how it related to his son:

“As terrible as this experience has been, we know that it’s practically nothing compared to the systemic racism and violence against Black life that he was protesting in the first place. Black communities across America have been terrorized for centuries by excessive police force . . . If you’re a beneficiary of systemic racism, then you will not be able to dismantle it at no cost to yourself. You will have to put yourself at risk. It might not always result in being physically attacked, but it will require you to make yourself vulnerable.”