Orioles can’t be feeling very good about their $50 million investment in Ubaldo Jimenez

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Ubaldo Jimenez is 13 starts into a four-year, $50 million deal with the Orioles and things aren’t going well at all.

Jimenez failed to make it out of the third inning Sunday on the way to his league-leading seventh loss of the season, dropping him to 2-7 with a 5.01 ERA overall. In addition to the league-high loss total he also leads the league in walks with 40, handing out 5.1 free passes per nine innings for what would be the highest rate of his already control-challenged career.

Jimenez was also awful for the Indians in 2012, going 9-17 with a 5.40 ERA, so he picked a helluva time to put together a strong season in 2013 before hitting the open market as a free agent. Although, in fairness to the Orioles, a $50 million investment in a free agent starting pitcher is hardly franchise-wrecking and in general the market for Jimenez was lower than many people expected.

He’s owed $12.25 million in 2015, $13 million in 2016, and $13.5 million in 2017.

It sounds like Adrián Beltré is mulling retirement

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Rangers third baseman Adrián Beltré is dealing with a Grade 2 strain of his left hamstring, marking the third time this season the 39-year-old has dealt with a hamstring issue. The injuries are weighing on Beltré, who sounds like he is mulling retirement.

Gerry Fraley of the Dallas Morning News reports that Beltré said, “It brings the question of is this going to keep happening more often? Is it worth it to fight back? Is it a sign that it’s getting closer to time to say good-bye to you guys?”

In 358 plate appearances this season, Beltré has hit .278/.335/.394 with seven home runs and 41 RBI. His .729 OPS would be his lowest since 2009, when he put up a .683 OPS with the Mariners. Beltré is a free agent after the season and turns 40 years old in April. It wouldn’t be surprising if he decided to call it quits after this season. If he does hang ’em up, Beltré will be — in this writer’s humble opinion — a first-ballot Hall of Famer when he is eligible five years from retirement.