Mets expect Travis d’Arnaud’s demotion to Triple-A to last “a while”

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Yesterday the Mets demoted rookie Travis d’Arnaud back to Triple-A and, based on manager Terry Collins’ comments, it sounds like the 25-year-old catcher should get comfortable in Las Vegas.

Asked by Adam Rubin of ESPN New York how long d’Arnaud was likely to remain in the minors, Collins replied:

I don’t have a timeframe, but it’s going to take him a while to get it going to where we think it’s, “Hey, look, it’s time to bring him back here.” … It’s very hard. He is our guy coming into spring training, and he’s been our guy since he got called up last year. But he’s a young player who is still learning, still trying to get better.

You weigh the factors of: Is he getting something out of this? Or is it hurting him in the long run to continue to struggle? As I told him last night, “You’re not the reason we’re not scoring, but right now the fingers are being pointed in your direction, which I don’t think is necessarily fair. So right now you’ve got to go get your swing, come back and tear it up like everybody expected.”

d’Arnaud was ranked as a top-100 prospect by Baseball America every season since 2010, including the No. 38 overall spot this year, but now he’s 25 years old with a .189 batting average through 70 career games and seems likely to spend at least the remainder of the first half at Triple-A (where he previously hit .328 with a .990 OPS in 86 games).

53-year-old Rafael Palmeiro homers in independent league ball

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It was announced earlier this month that 53-year-old Rafael Palmeiro signed a contract with the Cleburne Railroaders of the independent American Association, joining his son, former minor leaguer Patrick Palmeiro. The four-time All-Star went 0-for-8 to begin his stint with the club before launching a solo homer in the fifth inning last night. Check it out below.

If we’re being technical here, that was his first home run since July 30, 2005. He hit the homer off 28-year-old Trey McNutt, former prospect with the Cubs and Padres. Palmeiro made his major league debut in 1986, three years before McNutt was born.

Palmeiro told Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic last December that he was thinking about a comeback, but he understandably didn’t garner any serious consideration from MLB teams. This comeback attempt might not lead anywhere, but hey, he gets to show that he can still mash while hitting in the same lineup with his son. Palmeiro did that once before with the independent Sugar Land Skeeters in 2015, though it was just a one-game thing. As for the Railroaders, the national media attention can only help them.

Palmeiro is one of just six players in MLB history to reach 3,000 hits and 500 home runs, but he’s been a disgraced figure in the game since a failed drug test for performance-enhancing drugs in 2005. He dropped off the Hall of Fame ballot in 2014.