Lonnie Chisenhall first since 1975 to amass five hits, three home runs and nine RBI in one game

16 Comments

The phrase “post-hype breakout” gets thrown around a lot these days, but that’s exactly what we’re seeing right now with the Indians’ Lonnie Chisenhall.

Chisenhall enjoyed a monster game against the Rangers this evening, going 5-for-5 with three home runs and nine RBI as part of a 17-7 victory. He had an RBI single in the first inning, two-run homers in the second and fourth innings, an RBI double in the sixth, and a three-run blast in the eighth.

Chisenhall matched the Indians record with his nine RBI, which was also done by Chris James on May 4, 1991. He’s just the fourth player since 1920 (when MLB began tracking RBI) to amass five hits, three home runs, and nine RBI in one game and the first since Fred Lynn did it with the Red Sox on June 18, 1975. Going even further, Chisenhall is the first player since 1920 to do it while going a perfect 5-for-5.

Once considered a top prospect with the Indians, Chisenhall underwhelmed to the tune of a .244/.284/.411 batting line over his first 203 games in the majors, but something has clicked so far this year. The 25-year-old is batting .385/.429/.615 with seven home runs and 32 RBI through 51 games. He’s proving that patience is required with young players and can sometimes pay off in a big way.

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

Getty Images
9 Comments

Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.