Lonnie Chisenhall first since 1975 to amass five hits, three home runs and nine RBI in one game

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The phrase “post-hype breakout” gets thrown around a lot these days, but that’s exactly what we’re seeing right now with the Indians’ Lonnie Chisenhall.

Chisenhall enjoyed a monster game against the Rangers this evening, going 5-for-5 with three home runs and nine RBI as part of a 17-7 victory. He had an RBI single in the first inning, two-run homers in the second and fourth innings, an RBI double in the sixth, and a three-run blast in the eighth.

Chisenhall matched the Indians record with his nine RBI, which was also done by Chris James on May 4, 1991. He’s just the fourth player since 1920 (when MLB began tracking RBI) to amass five hits, three home runs, and nine RBI in one game and the first since Fred Lynn did it with the Red Sox on June 18, 1975. Going even further, Chisenhall is the first player since 1920 to do it while going a perfect 5-for-5.

Once considered a top prospect with the Indians, Chisenhall underwhelmed to the tune of a .244/.284/.411 batting line over his first 203 games in the majors, but something has clicked so far this year. The 25-year-old is batting .385/.429/.615 with seven home runs and 32 RBI through 51 games. He’s proving that patience is required with young players and can sometimes pay off in a big way.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.