Settling the Score: Friday’s results

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Well, would you look at that, the Rays won themselves a baseball game. Behind six scoreless innings from veteran left-hander Erik Bedard, the Rays topped the Mariners 4-0 last night to end their 10-game losing streak.

Going against his former team, Bedard gave up four hits and one walk while striking out eight batters. Jake McGee, Joel Peralta, and Grant Balfour combined for six strikeouts over the next three innings to finish off the shutout victory.

Little was expected from Bedard coming into the year, but he has a respectable 3.61 ERA over 10 starts and one relief appearance. He has a better ERA than David Price and Chris Archer right now. Wouldn’t have expected that in the spring.

Even after ending the long skid, the Rays still own the worst record in the majors at 24-38. They are currently 14 games behind the first-place Blue Jays in the American League East and eight back in the Wild Card race. They have a lot of work to do to make something out of their season.

Your Friday box scores:

Mariners 0, Rays 4

Marlins 3, Cubs 5 (13 innings)

Athletics 4, Orioles 3 (11 innings)

Cardinals 1, Blue Jays 3

Brewers 5, Pirates 15

Red Sox 2, Tigers 6

Phillies 8, Reds 0

Dodgers 7, Rockies 2

Braves 5, Diamondbacks 2

Indians 4, Rangers 6

Nationals 6, Padres 0

Yankees 4, Royals 2

Mets 2, Giants 4

Astros 5, Twins 4

White Sox 4, Angels 8

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.