Everyone can claim Don Zimmer as their own

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source: AP

I saw this tweet this morning and my first impression was to say, “oh, really?”

 

My dubiousness was a function of my age, though, as I came to know who Don Zimmer was when he managed the Red Sox and then the Rangers and I collected baseball cards of him on the Dodgers, so in my mind those are the teams with which I identify him. But if you add up all of his years as an everyday coach, He spent more time in a Yankees uniform than any other. Ten seasons over two distinct coaching stints and 36 games as a fill-in manager for Joe Torre one year. So maybe he is “forever a Yankee.”

Except he spent more seasons with the Rays as an advisor/instructor: 11. So maybe he’s forever a Ray?

Of course his most famous years probably came as the Red Sox’ manager. But man, he had nine seasons in a Cubs uniform and that was the only team for which he served as a player, manager and coach, so maybe he’s a Cub? But wait, the bulk of his playing career as a Dodger and stands as the last person to be a regular, active-duty uniformed baseball person who was a Brooklyn Dodger, and that has to count for something.

He also did time with the Senators, Mets, Reds, Padres, Rangers, Expos, Rockies and Giants. That’s what I cobbled together from Wikipedia and Baseball-Reference, anyway. I may be missing one in there someplace. As it stands: thirteen teams and significant achievements and memories for just about all of them.

A lot of people get called “a real baseball man” or “a good baseball man,” but I think it’s safe to say no one can lay claim to that title more than Don Zimmer. Every team he played for, managed, coached or advised can claim him. And I think even teams he never played for, managed, coached or advised can too.

Astros release Jon Singleton

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The Astros have released first baseman Jon Singleton, Chandler Rome of the Houston Chronicle reports.

Singleton, 26, was suspended for 100 games after testing positive for a drug of abuse for a third time. He has had issues with marijuana in the post and admitted to being a drug addict several years ago. He said, “At this point it’s pretty evident to me that I’m a drug addict. I don’t openly tell everyone that, but it’s pretty apparent to myself. I know that I enjoy smoking weed, I enjoy being high and I can’t block that out of my mind that I enjoy that. So I have to work against that.”

Singleton played parts of two seasons in the majors in 2014-15 with the Astros, batting a combined .171/.290/.331 with 14 home runs and 50 RBI in — appropriately — 420 plate appearances. He spent 2016 with Triple-A Fresno and 2017 with Double-A Corpus Christi, putting up middling numbers.

If he can convince teams he’s still actively working to overcome his addiction, Singleton may be able to find an opportunity elsewhere. But his road back to the majors remains long. He was once a top prospect in the Phillies’ system, then was traded to the Astros in the Hunter Pence deal back in July 2011.