MLB suspends Brandon Workman, but not David Price, after Red Sox-Rays plunkings

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MLB has suspended Red Sox right-hander Brandon Workman six games for throwing a pitch at Rays third baseman Evan Longoria on Friday.

Workman didn’t actually hit Longoria, as the pitch instead went behind him, but both teams had already been warned after David Price hit David Ortiz with a pitch earlier in the game. Workman claimed afterward that “the ball was slick and it slipped out of my hand.”

Also noteworthy: Price was not suspended for actually hitting Ortiz with a pitch, presumably because there had yet to be a warning issued. It’s also possible that MLB determined Price didn’t act on purpose, although Price’s comments afterward certainly suggested he had.

Workman is scheduled to start for the Red Sox tomorrow, so it would probably make sense for him to appeal the suspension, if only temporarily, so that he could pitch that game before sitting out.

Reds, Raisel Iglesias agree to three-year contract

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The Reds announced on Wednesday that the club and pitcher Raisel Iglesias agreed to a three-year contract. Iglesias had been on a seven-year, $27 million contract signed in June 2014 and had two years with $10 million remaining. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, the new contract is worth $24.125 million, so it’s a hefty pay raise for Iglesias.

Iglesias, who turns 29 years old in January, has gotten better every season pitching out of the Reds’ bullpen. In 2018, he posted a 2.38 ERA with 30 saves and an 80/25 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. Over his four-year career, the right-hander has 64 saves with a 2.97 ERA and a 359/106 K/BB ratio in 321 2/3 innings.

Iglesias gets little fanfare pitching for the Reds, fifth-place finishers in each of his four years, but he is certainly among baseball’s better relievers. Signing him to a new three-year deal gives them some certainty at the back of the bullpen in the near future.

There was a bit of confusion regarding his previous contract, which allowed him to opt out and file for arbitration if eligible. Iglesias has three years and 154 days of service time, so his new contract essentially covers his arbitration-eligible years.