David Ortiz rips David Price, calls him “a little girl” and “a little b-tch”

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Things got heated between the Rays and Red Sox last weekend and it continued last night at Fenway Park in Boston, as David Price hit both David Ortiz and Mike Carp with pitches, which eventually led to a benches-clearing incident. Brandon Workman, John Farrell, Torey Luvullo, and Brian Butterfield were all ejected during the evening for Boston while Price remained in the game and pitched seven innings. The Red Sox eventually won 3-2 in 10 innings.

As you may recall, Price was peeved when Ortiz took some extra time to admire a home run during Game 2 of the ALDS last year. Per CSNNE.com, Ortiz told reporters after last night’s game that the first-inning hit-by-pitch was retaliatory in nature and he used some inflammatory language to rip Price.

“You can’t be acting like a little girl out there,” said Ortiz. “You’re not going to win every time. When you give it up, that’s an experience for the next time. If you’re going act like a little [expletive] when you give it up, bounce back and put your teammates in jeopardy, that’s going to cost you.”

Ortiz made it clear that the actions belong to Price and Price alone.

“He knew he screwed up,” said Ortiz. “He did that on his own. No manager sent him. No player was comfortable with the situation. He did that on his own. Which is (expletive). He can get somebody else hurt. You can’t be doing that (stuff).”

“It’s on. Next time [Price] better bring the gloves. I have no respect for him no more.”

You certainly don’t want to see anybody get hurt with a silly beanball war, so it’s easy to understand Ortiz’s frustration here. However, it would be nice to see him get his point across without needlessly stepping into misogyny. Oh well.

Here’s video of Ortiz’s comments:

As for Price, he told Joe Smith of the Tampa Bay Times after the game that he didn’t throw at Ortiz and Carp on purpose. Of course, what else would you expect him to say?

“I’ve got to establish my fastball in,” Price said. “I’ve got six lefties in that lineup. It’s my favorite side of the plate to go to.”

Ortiz characterized the situation as “a war” during his post-game comments, so the rest of this weekend — and future matchups between Ortiz and Price — should be interesting.

Replay review over base-keeping needs to go

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The Red Sox are off and running in the first inning of Game 1 of the World Series against the Dodgers. Andrew Benintendi and J.D. Martinez each hit RBI singles off of Clayton Kershaw to give the Red Sox an early 2-0 lead.

Benintendi’s hit to right field ended with a replay review. Rather than throw to the cutoff man, right fielder Yasiel Puig fired home to try nabbing Mookie Betts, but his throw was poor. Catcher Austin Barnes caught the ball a few feet in front of and to the right of home plate, then whipped the ball to second base in an attempt to get Benintendi. Benintendi clearly beat the throw, but shortstop Manny Machado kept the tag applied. After Benintendi was ruled safe, the Dodgers challenged, arguing that Benintendi’s hand may have come off the second base bag for a microsecond while Machado’s glove was on him. The ruling on the field was upheld and the Red Sox continued to rally.

Replay review over base-keeping is not in the spirit of the rule and shouldn’t be permitted. Hopefully Major League Baseball considers changing the rule in the offseason. Besides the oftentimes uncontrollable minute infractions, these kinds of replay reviews slow the game down more than other types of reviews because they tend not to be as obvious as other situations.

Baseball has become so technical and rigid that it seems foolish to leave gray area in this regard. A runner is either off the base or he isn’t. However, the gradual result of enforcing these “runner’s hand came off the base for a fraction of a second” situations is runners running less aggressively and sliding less often so there’s no potential of them losing control of their body around the base. Base running, particularly the aggressive, sliding variety, is quietly one of the most fun aspects of the game. Policing the game to this degree, then, serves to make the game less fun and exciting.

Where does one draw the line then? To quote Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart, describing obscenity in Jacobellis v. Ohio, “I know it when I see it.” This is one area where I am comfortable giving the umpires freedom to enforce the rule at their discretion and making these situations impermissible for replay review.