Anthony Rizzo is “sick of” hearing the Cubs talk about Wrigley renovations, wants action

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There has been plenty of frustration on the fans’ side of things in regard to the delays with the Wrigley Field renovations, but the players are also unhappy. According to Patrick Mooney of CSNChicago.com, Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo said yesterday that he’s “sick of” hearing undelivered promises from the Cubs and would like to see some action.

“I’ve only been here a few years and guys before me have heard it before – changes were going to happen,” Rizzo said. “I don’t know what’s going on. Obviously, it’s not my job to do it. Obviously, we all want it. But when guys are promised that things are going to happen and they don’t happen, they’re not happy about it.

“Now it’s just kind of: ‘OK, when it gets done, it gets done.’ We’re not going to have our hopes up for anything.”

“We’ll have all the top-notch stuff and the new clubhouse is going to be the best in the game,” Rizzo said. “I know we’re going to do everything first-class, because that’s the way the organization is. It’s just that we’re kind of sick of hearing it’s going to be done. We just want to see it get done.”

Former Cub and now Padre pitcher Andrew Cashner recently referred to Wrigley Field a “dump,” which was a harsh way of saying that the facilities are super-outdated for the players. Of course, this isn’t particularly surprising given that the stadium opened in 1914. While the original plans called for the Cubs to have a bigger and more modern clubhouse by Opening Day this year, the new target date is 2016.

Rizzo is owed $41 million from the Cubs through 2019, so there’s a good chance he’ll eventually see some action to go along with the promises. Maybe. Someday.

Japanese Baseball to begin June 19

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Japanese League commissioner Atsushi Saito announced that Japan’s professional baseball season will open on June 19. Teams can being practice games on June 2. There will be no fans. Indeed, the league has not yet even begun to seriously discuss a plan for fans to begin attending games, though that may happen eventually.

The season will begin three months after its originally scheduled opening day of March 20. It will be 120 games long. Teams in each six-team league — the Central League and Pacific League — will play 24 games against each league opponent. There will be no interleague play and no all-star game.

The announcement came in the wake of a national state of emergency being lifted for both Tokyo and the island of Hokkaido. The rest of the country emerged from the state of emergency earlier this month. This will allow the Japanese leagues to follow leagues in South Korea and Taiwan which have been playing for several weeks.

In the United States, Major League Baseball is hoping to resume spring training in mid June before launching a shortened regular season in early July. That plan is contingent on the league and the players’ union coming to an agreement on both financial arrangements and safety protocols for a 2020 season. Negotiations on both are ongoing. Major League Baseball will, reportedly, make a formal proposal about player compensation tomorrow.