Dr. James Andrews releases a position paper on the Tommy John surgery epidemic

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We have posted about this a few times when Dr. James Andrews has given interviews on the subject of what he calls an “epidemic” in UCL tears and attendant Tommy John surgery. But now he and his American Sports Medicine have released a position paper on the matter.

In it he outlines the risk factors for Tommy John surgery, common misconceptions about it and his recommendations for pitchers and teams to limit the risk of needing it. As for that last part, this recommendation is likely to get the most play and, if heeded, affect the most change:

Do not always pitch with 100% effort. The best professional pitchers pitch with a range of ball velocity, good ball movement, good control, and consistent mechanics among their pitches. The professional pitcher’s objectives are to prevent baserunners and runs, not to light up the radar gun.

I think major league teams know that in practice once they have a pitcher and are developing him. But the defining trait of a scout is his radar gun, and young pitchers are conditioned to want to light it up when they see a scout checking them out. Good pitchers change speed and create movement. Young pitchers get noticed, however, when they throw in the 90s. It’ll be interesting to see if this changes that at all.

Anyway, consider thus must-click material. And something to bookmark if you’re at all interested in the subject.

Oakland Athletics reverse course, will continue to pay minor leaguers

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Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle reports that Oakland Athletics owner John Fisher has reversed course and will continue to pay minor leaguers. Fisher tells Slusser, “I concluded I made a mistake.” He said he is also setting up an assistance fund for furloughed employees.

The A’s decided in late May to stop paying paying minor leaguers as of June 1, which was the earliest date on which any club could do so after an MLB-wide agreement to pay minor leaguers through May 31 expired. In the event, the A’s were the only team to stop paying the $400/week stipends to players before the end of June. Some teams, notable the Royals and Twins, promised to keep the payments up through August 31, which is when the minor league season would’ve ended. The Washington Nationals decided to lop off $100 of the stipends last week but, after a day’s worth of blowback from the media and fans, reversed course themselves.