Doctors once studied whether bat-related injuries spiked in the wake of bat giveaway day at Yankee Stadium

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George Carlin — at least I think it was George Carlin — had an old bit that, as a tangent, talked about violence around a baseball park, with stinger to it in which he said “and hopefully it’s not bat day!” Ever since I heard that many years ago I have always thought about people beating the heck out of each other with bats every time I hear about a team giving away bats.

I’m not the only one, apparently. Enough doctors wondered about that at one point 20 years ago or so that a study was commissioned about it. The upshot of the study from the research abstract at the National Institutes of Health, which was released back in 1994 based on a study of bat day in 1990:

The distribution of 25,000 wooden baseball bats to attendees at Yankee Stadium did not increase the incidence of bat-related trauma in the Bronx and northern Manhattan. There was a positive correlation between daily temperature and the incidence of bat injury. The informal but common impressions of emergency clinicians about the cause-and-effect relationship between Bat Day and bat trauma were unfounded.

So, bat day is not a factor in people hitting other people with bats but heat is. Just another argument for domed stadiums.

(thanks to Jeremy Fox for the heads up on this oldie but goodie)

MLB has more evidence against Addison Russell than just his ex-wife’s blog post

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Major League Baseball put Cubs shortstop Addison Russell on administrative leave pursuant to its domestic violence policy the other day. The thought at the time was that the move was made solely because Russell’s ex-wife, Melisa Reidy, had written a blog post reiterating past claims of domestic violence. As Ken Rosenthal reports, however, that’s not all they had:

The post alone would not have been enough for baseball to force Russell off the field under its joint domestic violence policy with the players’ union. The league had additional credible information, according to sources familiar with its investigation.

The league’s investigation includes interviews with Reidy and numerous other witnesses, and with officials gathering additional information since Russell went on leave, sources said.

Reidy’s allegations alone, once assessed by MLB, would likely be enough to warrant Russell a suspension. That there is more out there would seem to make the case against him even stronger. The upshot: I think it’s extraordinarily unlikely that Russell will be back with the Cubs this year.