Jerry Reinsdorf is leading the charge against anointing Rob Manfred next commissioner

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When the owners created the committee to search for the next commissioner, I noted that this was something of a middle finger to Bud Selig’s clearly preferred plan of anointing Rob Manfred his successor. Michael S. Schmidt of the New York Times confirms that pretty darn clearly today.

Schmidt reports that Manfred’s candidacy — or, at the very least, his coronation — is being opposed by Jerry Reinsdorf, the Chicago White Sox owner. It’s surprising inasmuch as Reinsdorf has always been Selig’s number one ally among owners. Now, however, he’s working behind the scenes to thwart the one thing every king would like to have, and that’s the right to name his heir. Seems that Reinsdorf thinks this is a democracy!

“What I have said about Rob is none of your business,” Mr. Reinsdorf said in a telephone interview, interjecting an expletive.

Mr. Reinsdorf said he “had never said a bad word about Bud,” who he said “was the game’s best commissioner.” But he said that he believed that the owners — not Mr. Selig — should be in charge of picking the next one.

Or, as Schmidt characterizes it, Reinsdorf’s case is that “unlike owners who have hundreds of millions of dollars invested in their teams, Mr. Selig has no ownership in the game after he retires.”

All of which is understandable. And a nice reminder that, no matter what people like to think about the Commissioner of Baseball, he is not a leader as we usually think of that term. He’s just a CEO who answers to a powerful board of directors and serves at their pleasure.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.