Watch “Jungle Bird Man” run on the field at Nats park, get roughed up by security

117 Comments

At the Mets-Nats game on Friday night an environmental activist named Andrew Dudley, who goes by the name Jungle Bird Man, ran onto the field at Nats park, ran the bases, pantomimed a home run and then was promptly taken down and arrested. You can read his about his whole back story and his motivations at the Washington Post today.

None of that interests me all that much. I mean, go environment, but I doubt Jungle Bird Man is going to further the cause all that much by trespassing and videobombing sporting events. Maybe I’m wrong about that. Maybe Jungle Bird Man is the key to a verdant future. I guess we’ll see.

What does interest me is the takedown by security. Come for the fans demanding that he be tased, stay for the crazy-excessive force used by security against a guy who had his hands out in a “cuff me” motion representing complete surrender to authority:

Based on past comment threads around here, I’m sure many of you will cite Tom Gamboa, Monica Seles, 9/11 and the movies “Experiment in Terror” and “The Last Boy Scout” and claim that one can never be too careful. But I’m sorry, if security can’t appreciate that this guy is not a threat and can’t handle that guy without a choke-slam, something is pretty darn wrong.

Can anyone point to a moment where the guy threatened anyone on the field? Any point where he appeared to be dangerous or aggressive? Any point where he appeared to pose a risk to players, fans or security personnel? If you can identify it please let me know. If you can’t, and if you still think it was cool for the guy to be slammed to ground like that, you’re saying that all trespassing incidents justify the use of violent force.

The Giants are considering Pablo Sandoval at second base

AP Images
Leave a comment

Pablo Sandoval could be tabbed to play second base in the near future, per a report from John Shea of the San Francisco Chronicle. According to Shea, Sandoval has been spotted taking grounders at second during pre-game warm-ups and may be considering switching to the keystone on a part-time basis.

It wouldn’t be the weirdest thing the 31-year-old corner infielder has done this year — that distinction goes to the flawless inning of relief he pitched in a blowout loss against the Dodgers last month. But it would represent a pretty notable departure from his comfort zone even so; Sandoval has primarily manned first and third base throughout his 11-year career in the majors and has also taken a few reps at DH during his resurgence with the Giants in 2018.

Of course, this wouldn’t necessarily be a permanent switch for Sandoval. As Shea points out, the Giants are thin on middle infielders after losing Joe Panik to a torn UCL in his left thumb and backup Alen Hanson to a left hamstring strain. Provided he can get up to speed quickly (no easy feat, according to infield coach Ron Wotus), he’d give the club some added depth behind Kelby Tomlinson and Miguel Gomez until Panik is ready to take the field again. Sandoval has impressed at the plate this spring, batting a healthy .270/.329/.429 with six extra-base hits and a .757 through 70 plate appearances.