South Dakota and Santo Domingo: baseball hotbeds

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Andrew Powell-Morse of the Best Tickets blog shot me a link to his Unofficial 2014 MLB Players Census which is exactly what it sounds like: baseball’s population broken down and analyzed. By age, race, national origin, salary, handedness, everything. If you can measure a demographic attribute of a ballplayer and put it on a graph, they got it.

My favorite nugget in there: South Dakota has the highest per capita representation of all of the states in Major League Baseball. It has three major leaguers and very few people so, duh. California is third per capita, which is pretty impressive actually.

This is a good one to stump friends with: which city has produced the most current major leaguers? The answer is Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Which makes total sense given a second of thought. But because people tend to think in somewhat self-centered terms most people would probably go through U.S. cities first, I presume. For what it’s worth, Houston is second.

Anyway, lots of data. Lots of fun.

Michael Fulmer likely headed for Tommy John surgery

Detroit Tigers v Houston Astros
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Michael Fulmer was the 2016 AL Rookie of the Year Award winner. Last year he had his worst season as a major leaguer, finishing 3-12 with a 4.69 ERA and a 110/46 K/BB ratio in 132 1/3 innings. This spring he has been utterly lost in eight innings of work, getting hit hard and exhibiting diminished velocity. A few days ago, the Tigers shut him down and said they’d work on his mechanics.

Now comes the news that no one wanted to hear: the Tigers have announced that Dr. James Andrews has recommended that he get Tommy John surgery.

Fulmer is said to be seeking a third opinion — before Andrews he had an MRI and team doctors feared the worst — but let’s be real about what’s gonna happen here: Fulmer is going to miss the entire 2019 season and, in all likelihood, a good chunk of 2020 as well.

Tough break for Fulmer, one of the few good pitchers the Tigers had developed in some time.