Report: Mitch Williams called a ten-year-old a “pu**y” and ordered a beanball to take out an opposing pitcher

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Earlier this week Deadspin reported that, over the weekend, Mitch Williams lost his temper and had a long and nasty argument with an umpire during a Cal Ripken League tournament in which he was coaching. Now there’s more: Deadspin reports that Williams called a ten-year-old kid on the other team a “pu**y” and ordered a beanball. There is video over at Deadspin of the incident, described thusly:

Multiple witnesses report that interaction consisted of Williams calling the SJ Titans pitcher “a pu**y.” Children on the team heard this, and one asked his parent on the ride home what it meant .

A second video shows a pitcher-catcher meeting of Williams’ players. Context:

SJ Titans coaches and players overheard this interaction, and report that Williams ordered his pitcher to intentionally hit the SJ Titans batter with the first pitch. One witness told us it was in an attempt to knock the SJ Titans pitcher out of the game.

This is absolutely vile. It obviously has no place in youth baseball and, if Williams doesn’t have a compelling explanation of how everyone Deadspin spoke to is lying or wrong, he has no business coaching kids.

I’ll take it one step further: if all of this is true, I’d fire Williams from his job at MLB Network if it was up to me. There are plenty of ex-ballplayers who can talk about the game who don’t happen to be awful human beings. It’s already hard enough to watch any show on which Williams appears due to his usually incoherent analysis, but knowing what kind of a guy he is makes me not want to watch a moment of him on TV at all.

The Mets expect Tim Tebow to come back next year

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Mets assistant general manager John Ricco told Newsday today that he expects minor league outfielder Tim Tebow to return for a third season in professional baseball.

Tebow, 31, broke the hamate bone in his right hand while swinging a bat in late July, ending his season. It was a fairly successful season for him all things considered. After being promoted to Double-A Binghamton to start the year he hit .273/.336/.399 with six home runs, a stolen base and a .734 OPS in 298 plate appearances and made the Double-A All-Star team. That’s not the stuff of a top prospect — he strikes out far too much and the power numbers aren’t fantastic given that power would figure to be his strongest tool — but it’s pretty respectable for a guy his age and with his relative lack of baseball experience. As I said back in July, you can believe the Mets’ interest in Tebow is more marketing than baseball, but that does not preclude you from giving the guy a deserved tip of the cap for working hard and sticking it out in the bush leagues.

Assuming he does come back, the Mets are likely to start him at Triple-A Syracuse in the hopes that he’d eventually get to the bigs as a late season callup if the Mets aren’t in contention. Indeed, many believed that was the plan for him this year had he not been injured.