Royals are sticking with Mike Moustakas and his .147 batting average

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Royals third baseman Mike Moustakas is hitting .147 through 32 games, leading to speculation that he could be demoted back to the minors, but manager Ned Yost made it very clear yesterday that won’t be happening.

“I’m not doing it,” Yost told Andy McCullough of the Kansas City Star. “Simple as that. I’m not really discussing it. He’s going to stay here right now.”

General manager Dayton Moore was slightly less extreme in his support of Moustakas, suggesting that a change could be made eventually, and at the very least it sounds like Danny Valencia will continue to eat into Moustakas’ playing time at third base.

Moustakas is a 25-year-old former No. 2 overall pick and was once a top prospect, so that helps explain why the Royals are showing so much patience with him. But every season he has a big spring training to get everyone excited and then fails to produce when the games matter. He’s a career .237 hitter with a .670 OPS and horrendous 280/103 K/BB ratio in 408 career games and has shown no real signs of improvement.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.