Tommy Lasorda on V. Stiviano: “I hope she gets hit with a car”

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Tommy Lasorda is long time friends with Clippers’ owner Donald Sterling. He’s very clear that Sterling shouldn’t have said what he said and doesn’t condone any of it, so that much is good. But it’s not like he doesn’t have some strong feelings about the matter all the same. Particularly with respect to the woman whose recordings outed those Sterling comments in the first place:

“I’ve been a friend of that guy’s for 30 years,” he said. “It doesn’t surprise me that he said those things. And he shouldn’t have said it. He just hurt himself by talking too much and doing things he shouldn’t be doing.”

Lasorda also shared an unsolicited opinion on Sterling’s silly rabbit, V. Stiviano.

“And I don’t wish that girl any bad luck but I hope she gets hit with a car,” he said.

You can see video of those comments here from WBPF-TV in West Palm Beach. Based on his tone and demeanor, it seems like he’s pretty serious about that too.

Lasorda has spent a lot of his post-managerial life as an ambassador of the game and is often portrayed as some big, cuddly, lovable grandfather figure. But read anything about the guy that more than scratches the surface — and hear him say stuff like this, or other things he says when he’s not “on,” as it were — and you learn pretty quickly that he’s not at all cuddly. Not in the least.

(link via BTF)

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.