And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Marlins 3, Mets 0: It’s not just Jose Fernandez in Miami. Henderson Alvarez tossed his second shutout of the year, allowing six hits, striking out seven and not walking a soul. Casey McGehee drove in two.

Braves 2, Cardinals 1: The Braves snap their seven-game losing streak and do so with a fantastic performance from Gavin Floyd, making his first start post-Tommy John surgery. Floyd went seven, allowing only one run on six hits.

Dodgers 8, Nationals 3Now witness the firepower of this fully ARMED and OPERATIONAL Clayton Kershaw! Nine hits scattered over seven innings, nine strikeouts and nothing else doing. 

Pirates 2, Giants 1: A walkoff replay review. Well, a walkoff triple with the runner advancing home on an error, but Starling Marte was initially called out and then the call was reviewed and overturned. That’s the first time that has happened in history. And, for as odd and anticlimactic the whole thing was, this is the sort of play — a game-deciding play that the umpires on the field got wrong — that replay was designed to overturn.

Blue Jays 6, Phillies 5: Toronto jumped out to a 5-0 lead, Philly rallied for five with the help of a Cody Asche grand slam and then Toronto scored the winning run in the tenth on a sac fly. Cole Hamels gave up five runs on ten hits in six innings. He has given up 13 earned runs in 16.2 innings over three starts.

Tigers 11, Astros 4: A seven-run win and still not as close as the score would suggest. Miguel Cabrera had four hits and drove in four. The Tigers have won seven straight.

Indians 4, Twins 2: Josh Tomlin got the callup from Columbus and then got his first win since 2012, striking out four, walking one and taking a shutout into the seventh. Nice bit of bookending going on here as his last start before TJ surgery was against the Twins and he was shelled.

Diamondbacks 7, Brewers 5: Aaron Hill went 4 for 4 with a pair of RBI singles on Monday. On Tuesday he hit a two-run homer in the eighth to help the Snakes take this one. I’m sure there are other ways to have fun in Milwaukee, but this is a pretty good one for a ballplayer.

Editor’s Note: Hardball Talk‘s partner FanDuel is hosting a one-day $40,000 Fantasy Baseball league for Wednesday night’s MLB games. It’s $25 to join and first prize is $6,000. Starts at 7:05pm ET on WednesdayHere’s the FanDuel link.

Orioles 5, Rays 3: There was a 19-minute delay in this one due to the lights going out thanks to a nearby storm. Which, sure, scoff all you want about the quality of Tropicana Field, but at least they have a roof. Ryan Flaherty and Nick Markakis drove in runs after play resumed to give Baltimore the lead and the game.

White Sox 5, Cubs 1: Gordon Beckham’s homer in the eighth broke a 1-1 tie and the Southsiders rallied for three more in the ninth to beat the Northsiders. Four hits in all for Beckham, which is pretty spiffy for a guy who has been struggling as much as he has.

Red Sox 4, Reds 3: A walkoff hit for Grady Sizemore in the 12th. He had previously singled home a run in the third and had another hit in the eighth.

Mariners 8, Athletics 3: Roenis Elias struck out six while pitching into the seventh, Justin Smoak drove in three and the M’s won their fourth straight.

Rockies 12, Rangers 1: The Rockies rap 21 hits. Carlos Gonzalez had five of them and Troy Tulowtizki and Drew Stubbs each had three. Nolan Arenado extended his hitting streak to 26 games. The 2014 Rockies are re-earning the name Blake Street Bombers. They are just destroying everyone on offense.

Royals 3, Padres 1: Alex Gordon singled in the go-ahead run in the 11th inning and Billy Butler followed with an RBI double to help the Royals snap their five-game losing streak. Jeremy Guthrie, Wade Davis and Greg Holland combined to hold the Padres to six hits.

Yankees 4, Angels 3: Most of these games last night felt the same, at least when reading the box scores. A late run to break a tie with a solo shot or something. Which, hey, OK, not every game needs to be totally dramatic. Just odd. Here Brian Roberts did the deed for New York, hitting his first one of the year.

Zack Cozart thinks the way the Rays have been using Sergio Romo is bad for baseball

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The Rays started Sergio Romo on back-to-back days and if that sounds weird to you, you’re not alone. Romo, of course, was the star closer for the Giants for a while, helping them win the World Series in 2012 and ’14. He’s been a full-time reliever dating back to 2006, when he was at Single-A.

In an effort to prevent lefty Ryan Yarbrough from facing the righty-heavy top of the Angels’ lineup (Zack Cozart, Mike Trout, Justin Upton), Romo started Saturday’s game, pitching the first inning before giving way to Yarbrough in the second. Romo struck out the side, in fact. The Rays went on to win 5-3.

The Rays did it again on Sunday afternoon, starting Romo. This time, he got four outs before giving way to Matt Andriese. Romo walked two without giving up a hit while striking out three. The Angels managed to win 5-2 however.

Despite Sunday’s win, Cozart wasn’t a happy camper with the way the Rays used Romo. Via Fabian Ardaya of The Athletic, Cozart said, “It was weird … It’s bad for baseball, in my opinion … It’s spring training. That’s the best way to explain it.”

It’s difficult to see merit in Cozart’s argument. It’s not like the Rays were making excessive amounts of pitching changes; they used five on Saturday and four on Sunday. The games lasted three hours and three hours, 15 minutes, respectively. The average game time is exactly three hours so far this season. I’m having trouble wondering how else Cozart might mean the strategy is bad for baseball.

It seems like the real issue is that Cozart is afraid of the sport changing around him. The Rays, like most small market teams, have to find their edges in slight ways. The Rays aren’t doing this blindly; the strategy makes sense based on their opponents’ starting lineup. The idea of valuing on-base percentage was scoffed at. Shifting was scoffed at and now every team employs them to some degree. Who knows if starting a reliever for the first three or four outs will become a trend, but it’s shortsighted to write it off at first glance.