The day Tom Seaver got two wins

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Tyler Kepner of the New York Times has a wonderful story today about one of the longest games in baseball history. The absolute longest if you by actual game time instead of mere innings. It occurred on May 8-9, 1984. Yes, both days, as the Brewers and White Sox started on the 8th, hit curfew on early on the 9th and resumed the game the following day after it was suspended. All-in-all it was 25 innings and lasted over eight hours. The White Sox won.

The winning pitcher? Tom Seaver, who came on in relief once the game resumed the next day. The winning pitcher for the next game, played the same day: Tom Seaver, who was the scheduled starter. He just used that 25-inning affair as warmup.

The story is great beyond those odd facts of a bygone era. Kepner talks to many of the principles and it all rolls out like a wonderful baseball yarn. This is the kind of baseball writing that is most enjoyable. And it’s a great read.

Now, if someone can tell my old butt how a game I remember being talked about at the time as current news can be 30-years-old, I’d greatly appreciate it.

Donaldson ejected for kicking dirt on plate after home run

David Banks-USA TODAY Sports
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Minnesota’s Josh Donaldson managed to get ejected while hitting a home run.

Donaldson barked at plate umpire Dan Bellino for the second time in the sixth inning of a 4-3 loss to the Chicago White Sox on Thursday.

With the score 2-2, Bellino called a strike when the 2015 AL MVP checked his swing on a 2-0 pitch from Reynaldo Lopez.

Manager Rocco Baldelli came out to speak with Bellino, and Donaldson homered down the left-field line on the next offering. After rounding the bases, Donaldson kicked dirt at home plate as he crossed it.

Bellino ejected him immediately, and Donaldson, realizing he had missed home plate, returned to the plate to touch it and then argued as he kicked more dirt on it.

Donaldson also had argued with Bellino on a 1-1 breaking ball in the first inning that appeared to be high but was called a strike, leading to a strikeout.

“We need Josh on the field, out there playing, and at third base,” Baldelli said. “That’s when we’re at our best. And so that’s really the end of it. I think we can move past it at his point, and go from here.”

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