Orioles deny being “in discussions” with Kendrys Morales

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Over the weekend Jon Heyman of CBSSports.com reported that the Orioles “have been in discussions” with unsigned free agent first baseman Kendrys Morales “at several points over the past few weeks.”

However, yesterday executive vice president Dan Duquette told Jim Bowden of MLB Network Radio that the Orioles haven’t talked to Morales since they signed Nelson Cruz in late February.

Based on Heyman’s wording and Duquette’s wording it seems obvious that one of them is, let’s say, being less than truthful, although in fairness it could simply be that Heyman was told incorrect information by Morales’ representatives–which happens to be Scott Boras–and Duquette is simply trying to deflect questions about the talks.

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More position players have pitched this year than ever

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Yesterday, in Milwaukee, utilityman Hernan Perez pitched two scoreless innings, and backup catcher Erik Kratz pitched one himself, mopping up in a blowout loss to the Dodgers. In doing so they became the 31st and 32nd position players to pitch this season. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, that is the most position players who have taken the mound in a season in the Expansion Era, which began in 1961. Presumably far fewer ever did so when the league had only 16 teams.

It’s pretty remarkable to set that record now, in this age of 13 and sometimes 14-man pitching staffs. That’s especially true when teams shuttle guys back and forth from the minors more often than they ever have before and when, due to the shortened, 10-day disabled list, it’s easier to give guys breaks because of “injuries” than it ever has been.

Pitcher usage is driving this, however. While teams carry far more relievers than they ever have before, they actually carry far fewer swingmen or mopup men who are capable of throwing multiple innings in a blowout to save other pitchers’ arms. Rather, teams focus on max-effort, high-velocity relievers who go one or two innings tops, thus requiring catchers and utility guys to help do the mopping that actual pitchers used to do.

I don’t know if that’s a bad thing necessarily — some of these backup catchers throw harder than a lot of pitchers did 30 years ago and it’s always kind of fun to see a position player pitch — but it is yet another way the game has changed due to a focus on specialization and velocity when it comes to pitchers.