Peter Bourjos has been benched by the Cardinals

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Peter Bourjos began the season as the Cardinals’ primary center fielder, but then he slumped his way into fewer starts in favor of Jon Jay and now it looks like he’s been benched altogether.

St. Louis called up prospect Randal Grichuk and is now giving him some of the playing time previously reserved for Bourjos, with manager Mike Matheny explaining it to Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post Dispatch rather bluntly:

The assignment for us is to be honest, as open with him as possible. “We’ve got to get you going, but we’ve got to get our club going, too. If we have an opportunity to bring some player in who can get us a jolt we’re going to make a shot at it. Stay ready.”

Bourjos is hitting .160 with a .510 OPS in 20 games, which is bad enough that even his always excellent defense can’t make up for it.

Grichuk was acquired from the Angels, along with Bourjos, in the David Freese trade, so his now pushing Bourjos aside–in the short term, at least–is a weird little twist. His strike zone control and plate discipline leave a lot to be deserved, but Grichuk has 20-homer power and right now the Cardinals are desperate for some offense.

Oh, and there’s also this: Freese is hitting .188 for the Angels.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.