Yankees fans will probably boo Robinson Cano. And it doesn’t matter one way or the other.

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I used to have some strong opinions about when it’s OK to boo or not OK to boo. And I still think that some instances of booing are worse than others depending on the circumstances. But I’ve changed my mind about booing pretty substantially over the past couple of years and refuse to get all that worked up about it anymore.

Personally, I rarely if ever boo someone — or if I do, I do it somewhat ironically — but I’m mostly done caring if other fans boo someone. When you compare it to the intensely personal things about players and their character that some fans will say in comment threads, some sports writers will write in their columns or some talk radio guys will bark over the air, booing looks like a pretty minor act. It may be worth noting with amusement — I expect to continue to write amused “[Team’s] fans booed [Person]” posts in the future — but seriously taking fans to task for booing or not booing someone seems kinda silly to me now.

Booing is not nearly as personal an act as it’s often portrayed as being in the sporting press. Look no further than the Robinson Cano/Jimmy Fallon bit from last night. Fans booed a cardboard cutout of Robinson Cano and then immediately changed their tune when the real Cano came out. It was pretty inspired, pretty funny and it gave us a bit of insight, I think, into the nature of booing. Maybe it’s not the most polite thing ever, but a given fan’s investment in booing is so fleeting and minor. I’d guess 90% of the people who do it at a ballpark do it because other people started doing it and group activities are fun. I’d also guess that the negative impulse to boo someone is gone before the guy in question has taken his first pitch. It’s just a thing you do at the ballpark sometimes. Like the chicken dance.

Which brings us to tonight’s Mariners-Yankees game. Cano is back in New York for the first time since signing with the Mariners, and the topic of whether or not Yankees fans should boo him is floating around on talk radio and on the web today. If I was a Yankees fan I’d probably not because, like I said, my baseline is generally not to boo and Cano didn’t do anything wrong or evil that would make me change my feelings about that.

But I expect he will be booed and I really don’t care. If it happens it’ll be a generalized “you don’t wear the same laundry” boo that runs about as deep as an Arizona creek. It won’t be based on real animus or a set of misguided ethics. It won’t be aimed at a person who is fragile or a stranger to big crowds and intense feeling. It’s Robinson Cano. I suspect he can handle it.

Red Sox place Nathan Eovaldi on 10-day injured list

Nathan Eovaldi
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The Red Sox have assigned right-hander Nathan Eovaldi to the 10-day injured list after finding a loose body in his right elbow, per a team announcement. In a corresponding move, left-handed reliever Bobby Poyner was recalled from Triple-A Pawtucket to take Eovaldi’s spot on the 25-man roster.

While the move is retroactive to April 18, there’s little reason to believe that Eovaldi will be back on the mound anytime soon. The veteran righty has a history of elbow issues and missed over two months of the 2018 season when he underwent arthroscopic surgery to remove loose bodies from his elbow last spring. For now, however, any definite recovery timetable or pending surgical procedures have yet to be announced.

After struggling through his first few outings of 2019, Eovaldi looked like he finally hit his stride during his last start against the Yankees on Wednesday. He tossed six quality innings, allowing just one unearned run, three hits, and three walks, and striking out six of 23 batters in the Red Sox’ eventual 5-3 loss. He currently holds a 6.00 ERA, 4.7 BB/9, and 6.9 SO/9 across 21 innings.

The Red Sox have not formally announced a replacement for Eovaldi in the rotation, but will turn to Poyner as they seek to strengthen a bullpen that currently ranks eighth-best in the AL. The 26-year-old lefty reliever presented well for Triple-A Pawtucket in his first five appearances of 2019, issuing three runs, five walks, and 13 strikeouts through 6 1/3 innings.