Wanna buy a $14,000 baseball glove?

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And the kicker here is that it’s not that expensive due it to being worn by Mickey Mantle or autographed by Satchel Paige. It’s $14,100 because, well, it has the Hermès name on it and rich people may buy this crap. From the Marketwatch story in which I found this atrocity:

What makes the glove so expensive? Begin with the “absolutely top-grade” France-sourced leather, Chavez explains. (Hermès refers to it as “gold swift calfskin” leather, though there’s no actual gold involved.) Then factor in the hand-stitching and construction. “It takes 25 hours for one person to make this glove,” Chavez adds. Plus, there’s the Hermès name, which carries a certain cachet.

As Marketwatch notes, major leaguers’ gloves usually cost around $200 and rarely over $500. You can get a nice glove at a sporting goods store far cheaper than that.

If you buy this thing, you are essentially buying a ticket to be the first one against the wall when the revolution comes.

(Thanks to Gary Hagen for the heads up)

 

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.