Wanna buy a $14,000 baseball glove?

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And the kicker here is that it’s not that expensive due it to being worn by Mickey Mantle or autographed by Satchel Paige. It’s $14,100 because, well, it has the Hermès name on it and rich people may buy this crap. From the Marketwatch story in which I found this atrocity:

What makes the glove so expensive? Begin with the “absolutely top-grade” France-sourced leather, Chavez explains. (Hermès refers to it as “gold swift calfskin” leather, though there’s no actual gold involved.) Then factor in the hand-stitching and construction. “It takes 25 hours for one person to make this glove,” Chavez adds. Plus, there’s the Hermès name, which carries a certain cachet.

As Marketwatch notes, major leaguers’ gloves usually cost around $200 and rarely over $500. You can get a nice glove at a sporting goods store far cheaper than that.

If you buy this thing, you are essentially buying a ticket to be the first one against the wall when the revolution comes.

(Thanks to Gary Hagen for the heads up)

 

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.