Sammy Sosa wasn’t invited to Wrigley Field’s 100th birthday

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Wrigley Field in Chicago is celebrating its 100th birthday today with a lot of hoopla, including a Cubs-Diamondbacks throwback game, a 400-pound cake, and a whole bunch of former players in attendance.

Sammy Sosa is not among them, because the Cubs didn’t bother to invite him. Obviously it’s easy to figure out why they’d rather just sweep Sosa and his time with the team under the rug, but it still seems awfully sketchy to actually do so considering how great he was at Wrigley Field.

Sosa played 917 career games at Wrigley Field and hit .289 with 293 homers and a .960 OPS there.

I’m sure plenty of people disagree, but I absolutely think the Cubs should have invited Sosa and I’d have bet an awful lot of money–or at least, say, Calcaterra’s house–that the Wrigley Field crowd would have given him a huge ovation.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.