Today is the Sox’ annual Patriot’s Day game. It’s more significant now than ever.

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Today the Red Sox play their annual Patriot’s Day morning game. And today is the Boston Marathon. Emotions at both locations will run high.

Last year, the Red Sox beat the Rays in a walkoff win. As that game was ending, everything was changing. As the team headed to the airport for their flight to the next city and next series, news of the Boston Marathon bombings spread and the entire city of Boston was shaken. There was fear and confusion and sorrow but, a few days later when the Red Sox got back to town, those feelings were met with strength and resolve. They were met with David Ortiz’s stirring speech to Red Sox fans and the city as a whole: “This is OUR F***in’ City!” he said. And with that, Boston Strong came to define the Red Sox season

Which isn’t to say that what happened at the Marathon was about the Red Sox or that everything the Red Sox do is about the Marathon. But it is undeniable that the Red Sox served as a rallying point and welcome diversion from the horror that was visited upon the city last Patriot’s Day. And that the tragedy of the bombings and the example the city set in the wake helped inspire the team. I’m sure every city would rally strongly if such a thing were to occur there — we’ve, unfortunately, seen cities have to do that in the past — but it just served as another reminder of how particularly close the Red Sox and Boston are. How the bond between sports and the city as a whole may be stronger in Boston than a lot of places, for a lot of reasons.

Last night the heroes of the aftermath of the bombings were remembered at Fenway Park in an official ceremony. I suspect that, later this morning, there will be many more unofficial remembrances to go along with it as the Red Sox take the field on a beautiful Patriot’s Day. In a city that could not be defeated and I suspect cannot be defeated.

Angels place Andrew Heaney on 10-day injured list

Andrew Heaney
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The Angels have placed Andrew Heaney on the 10-day injured list with left shoulder inflammation, the club announced Saturday. The move is retroactive to July 17, though it’s not yet certain that he’ll be cleared to pitch again by the end of the month.

It’s an unfortunate development for the 28-year-old southpaw, who has battled inflammation in his pitching elbow on and off since spring training. In fact, his arm issues date back several years, including the shoulder impingement that put him on the shelf in 2017 and the Tommy John surgery he underwent in 2016. With such a complicated medical history, it makes sense that the Angels would want to proceed with caution as they facilitate the lefty’s eventual return to the mound.

Given his ongoing struggles, Heaney has seen mixed results with the club in 2019. Prior to his recent IL assignment, he pitched to a 1-3 record in nine starts with a 5.09 ERA, 3.7 BB/9, and 10.6 SO/9 through 46 innings. Since the end of June, however, his starts have gotten shorter and shorter; he lasted just 4 1/3 innings in his final outing against the Astros, expending a tremendous 103 pitches and issuing two runs, two walks, and five strikeouts during the team’s eventual 7-2 win.

In a corresponding roster move, the Angels claimed lefty reliever Adalberto Mejía off of waivers from the Twins. Mejía, 26, is expected to be activated ahead of Saturday’s game versus the Mariners. Over 13 appearances with Minnesota, he turned in an 8.80 ERA, 7.0 BB/9, and 8.8 SO/9 in 15 1/3 innings.