Chipper Jones chimed in on the Carlos Gomez incident

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The benches were emptied on Sunday afternoon during the Brewers-Pirates series. Brewers outfielder Carlos Gomez hit a 400-foot triple off of Pirates starter Gerrit Cole, and he admired it while slowly making his way to first base. When he noticed the ball was not, in fact, going to leave the ballpark, Gomez turned on the afterburners and scurried to third base. Cole barked at Gomez, and Gomez didn’t take too kindly to it. A fracas ensued.

It’s not the first nor the last time that we will see pitchers being sensitive to hitters acting cocky after crushing one of their mistake pitches. Likewise, we’ll continue seeing players defending their honor when called out.

Former Baseball Police Braves third baseman Chipper Jones, also a former teammate of Baseball Police Chief Brian McCann (a participant in last year’s incident with Gomez), decided to chime in on the matter on Twitter:

Someone responded to Jones, suggesting that Jones himself has admired his own baseball work.

So, remember kids, if you want to stare, don’t misjudge a 400-foot fly ball by a couple of inches. That’s just rude.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.