Chipper Jones chimed in on the Carlos Gomez incident

111 Comments

The benches were emptied on Sunday afternoon during the Brewers-Pirates series. Brewers outfielder Carlos Gomez hit a 400-foot triple off of Pirates starter Gerrit Cole, and he admired it while slowly making his way to first base. When he noticed the ball was not, in fact, going to leave the ballpark, Gomez turned on the afterburners and scurried to third base. Cole barked at Gomez, and Gomez didn’t take too kindly to it. A fracas ensued.

It’s not the first nor the last time that we will see pitchers being sensitive to hitters acting cocky after crushing one of their mistake pitches. Likewise, we’ll continue seeing players defending their honor when called out.

Former Baseball Police Braves third baseman Chipper Jones, also a former teammate of Baseball Police Chief Brian McCann (a participant in last year’s incident with Gomez), decided to chime in on the matter on Twitter:

Someone responded to Jones, suggesting that Jones himself has admired his own baseball work.

So, remember kids, if you want to stare, don’t misjudge a 400-foot fly ball by a couple of inches. That’s just rude.

Diamondbacks say they’re not rebuilding

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Despite losing Patrick Corbin and A.J. Pollock to free agency, then trading Jean Segura to the Phillies and Paul Goldschmidt to the Cardinals, the Diamondbacks insist they’re not entering a rebuilding mode, Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports.

Most likely, this is just the D-Backs saving face publicly given how much contention there has been between ownership and the players’ union over teams aggressively not competing. The D-Backs aren’t expected to be in the running for any of the bigger-name free agents, so it’s going to be very tough to replace the production lost from Corbin, Pollock, Segura, and Goldschmidt. The smart money is still on expecting the D-Backs to continue trading away players like Robbie Ray and David Peralta. Greinke might stay, but only because of his contract, which still has three years and $95.5 million remaining.